Megan Fox Covers Esquire's February 2013 Issue | Pictures

Megan Fox Compares Fame to Being "Bullied" in Esquire

Megan Fox bared her bra on the cover of Esquire.

Megan Fox strikes a bombshell pose on the cover of Esquire's February issue, but inside the pages of the magazine, she compares her experience as a celebrity to being bullied on a "global scale." Megan gave birth to her first child in 2012 and talks about working toward moving beyond her sex-symbol status, which she says made her feel "powerless," in the interview. She also reflects on her upbringing in the Pentecostal church, where she spoke in tongues alongside the other members of the congregation, and why she's rethinking some of her many tattoos. The issue hits newsstands on Jan. 22. Here's more from Megan Fox in Esquire:

  • On what it's like to be famous: "I don't think people understand. They all think we should shut the f**k up and stop complaining because you live in a big house or you drive a Bentley. So your life must be so great. What people don't realize is that fame, whatever your worst experience in high school, when you were being bullied by those ten kids in high school, fame is that, but on a global scale, where you're being bullied by millions of people constantly."
  • On why she's removing her Marilyn Monroe tattoo: "I started reading about her and realized that her life was incredibly difficult. It's like when you visualize something for your future. I didn't want to visualize something so negative. . . . She was sort of like Lindsay [Lohan]. She was an actress who wasn't reliable, who almost wasn't insurable. . . . She had all the potential in the world, and it was squandered. I'm not interested in following in those footsteps."
  • On speaking in tongues at church: "I have seen magical, crazy things happen. I've seen people be healed. . . . It feels like a lot of energy coming through the top of your head — I'm going to sound like such a lunatic — and then your whole body is filled with this electric current. And you just start speaking, but you're not thinking because you have no idea what you're saying. Words are coming out of your mouth, and you can't control it.
  • Photos courtesy Sante D'Orazio for Esquire

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