Skip Nav

Rupert Sanders Talks Kristen Stewart in Snow White (Video)

Video: Director Rupert Sanders on Pushing Kristen Stewart to New Limits in SWATH

Director Rupert Sanders took on the task of reinventing the classic Snow White fairy tale for the big screen in Snow White and the Huntsman, which hits theaters on June 1. We sat down with him during a recent press day in the UK, where he chatted with us about the serious weather they faced during filming and his leading lady, Kristen Stewart. Rupert shared that Kristen was tenacious and rebellious, and he even addressed her tendency for on-set injuries. Watch our interview with Rupert now!

View Transcript »
Transcript

She's like a kind of wild horse, kind of trying to rein her down. a very collaborative process, so I want everyone to be friends, I created more of an independent spirit, so people could get on and have fun together. Was there any part of seeing the finished product that surprised even you as the director? I think it surprised me that I've actually finished it. It was quite a long process, 90 days out in the cold, it kind of wears on you a bit. And then when when I got to see the first assembly very quickly after we shot it, I was like, oh my God, it works. It was long and it wasn't right, but I knew that I had the pieces and so we didn't need to do reshoots is there anything which is a huge relief, 'cause we wrapped in Christmas, so we had sixteen weeks to post-produce the film. So its been quite a mad rush to the finish And you did shoot it sort of out in the elements. Yeah. What part of that was the hardest on you or the actors? Just, you know, you're dealing with the mercy of the weather. Luckily we were blessed as we are today. We we had when we needed it. The sun just miraculously came out for five days at a time, which in England is pretty rare. The first day we shot was a monsoon and I was like, "This is never gonna work." and my career is down the tubes, 'cause if you don't meet the budget and the deadline you might as well, you know, give up. So that was a big worry and then it The next time it rang really badly was the last day of shooting. So we were pretty lucky throughout the whole film, when we were outside we got, we got pretty lucky with the weather. But you're doing a lot of night shoots, it's tiring, and it's cold, but it's its kind of that stiff upper lip we have in England, isn't it? We'll just keep going. And I think before this movie, people haven't really gotten to see Kristen Stewart's sort of bad-ass side. What do you think about her that made her the perfect snow-white for this? Yeah. I think she's tenacious and rebellious and very kind of raw and primal. She's kind of like a wild horse, kind of trying to her down. She just has that kind of modernity that I really wanted Snow White to have. She's not just sitting by the well waiting for the Prince to come. And Kristen has a bit of a history of herself on set. Were you worried at all about her when she was doing any of the action scenes? There were a few moments where I was like, "Oh." But, you know, she she really puts herself out there and she really goes for it, so she's going to get hurt. I think you have to be able to guard her enough that she's not going to get hurt too badly. We've done a bit of painting out of bandages and stuff. No, she was great to work with, and I - she pushed herself and I pushed her to really, you know, jump off cliffs, to fall into deep holes of mud, to ride horses, to get in the freezing Welsh Sea. You know, she went there. and that's very admirable. Then actually she and Charlize don't really get to share very much screen time in the whole movie. No. Did they, did you sort of keep them apart filming as well? No, I mean you know that, Charlize and, sitting, going, Oh good Kristen when we're doing something that doesn't involve her. They met because we'd be passing as they were coming in and out of places, so you know, and we all, I feel it's important when you're working together that you work together as a group. You know, it's obviously a very collaborative process, so I want everyone to be friends. I I created more of an independent spirit, so people could get on and have fun together. And Charlize's looks in the movie are incredible. Yeah. How involved were for you with that process? I've worked with Colleen Atwood for quite a few years, and so we had an existing relationship, and we just, again, it's a lot of sit down, you talk about the character, you talk about the themes, you show reference to each other, and you start to just kind of find a path. And once you find that path Colleen takes it and goes. And then when she showed me some of the rough assembly, it's just like, wow, it's incredible. And what's amazing when you see the whole film there's this kind of integrity throughout all the characters of the costume and they feel so part of the world, which is amazing. And sort of the notion that women have an expiration date in terms beauty, it's like it's very, a Hollywood notion as well. Yeah. Do you think about that at all when you work? I think men have an expiration date in beauty to be honest. You know, I think that's one of the themes in there. I don't get aimed at Hollywood. I think our Western culture is very youth obsessed. And I think, you know, there's a lot of themes in there that people can take things from. I think one of them that I really like is kind of what symbolizes Snow White, which is there's a rose blooming in defiance of the cold at the beginning. So you've got this flower blooming in Winter. Everything around it is dead and frosty. And I think that says to me that when everything's kind of bad around and you just, you know, you just have to blossom in life. And that's really what Snow White does in front of the queen. That's her kind of audacious step. She comes to [xx] alive