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The Indoor Tanning Association

Tanning-Bed Industry: "Tanning Rules, Dermatologists Drool!"

I don't know whether to laugh or cry over this one. You know how pretty much every dermatologist ever sings the praises of sunblock due to its ability to prevent wrinkles and skin cancer? According to the Indoor Tanning Association, it's all a lie. The group, which lobbies on the behalf of tanning salons nationwide, has released an ad campaign touting the benefits of bathing in ultraviolet light. In a full-page ad in today's New York Times, the group claims that there's "no compelling scientific evidence that tanning causes melanoma."

What's more, the ITA decries "front groups" that advocate use of sunblock. You know, shady groups such as the Skin Cancer Foundation (who, by the way, points to a study that finds a strong link between tanning bed use and melanoma risk). Dermatologists, the ITA claims, are in the pocket of the lucrative sunscreen industry.

It's a clever-enough propaganda campaign. Too bad it's a bunch of horse poop. But don't take my word for it. To see what a skin-cancer survivor had to say about it

.

ABC News had a good take on the subject, and along with talking with doctors, the reporter spoke with a cancer survivor:

"I don't think they're being honest at all," said Emily Konesky, who fought off advanced stage melanoma two years ago. She said her doctor attributed her illness to her tanning salon habit.

"It is not natural for a 19-year-old to be diagnosed with cancer that takes 30 to 40 years to develop," said Konesky, who used to go to indoor tanning salons as much as four times a week. "I wake up every single morning and think this could be the day that the cancer could come back."

My dermatologist says the same thing: He's seeing young women develop melanoma before they're even old enough to drink. And yes, he said, they used tanning beds. So don't fall for this propaganda. As the traditional tanning season begins, be smart, skeptical, and sunblocked.

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DJM-DE DJM-DE 8 years
JulieJulie I'm going to try to respond to your links. 1st Link: "Patients with a history of melanoma were significantly more likely to report tanning bed sessions exceeding 20 min (P 0.01; OR, 3.18; 95% CI, 1.48-6.82);" Most salons today don't even offer tanning sessions in excess of 20 minutes. They also didn't report if the patients tanned in moderation. It appears that was a survey done by dermatologists. 2nd Link: That is the same group of studies the WHO uses. Are you aware they only selected the studies where those interviewed were never asked if they had previous sunburns so these studies are not complete or reliable. 3rd Link: If you dig deeper into the details of the study you'll find this: "The ratio of UVB to UVA emitted by indoor tanning devices was greatly reduced around 1980.24,27,28 We did not differentiate age category or calendar year of the usage of indoor tanning devices on the questionnaire. Because the age of our study population at baseline (1976) ranged from 30 to 55, it is possible that the majority in this study was of older UVB-emitting devices." 4th Link: This is not a scientific study it was an observation and conclusion made by dermatologists. Once again dig deeper into the actual findings of this study and you will find this person had a genetic link to melanoma. Here is the important paragraph you missed: "This individual had substantial sun exposure prior to the tanning bed exposure. He is thus very similar to many individuals using tanning parlors. Those who exhibit sun-seeking behavior will always have complex exposures with mixes of different UV action spectra.3-4,7 It is virtually impossible to precisely quantify total life exposure, but routine tanning bed use over many months represents an intense burst of UV exposure. Rapid change in multiple nevi and the development of new lesions shortly after this are likely related to activation of the melanocytic system. Although early sun exposure is important generally in the development of melanoma,1 and was specifically in this individual (since he developed his first melanoma at age 15 years), the short latency of these reported lesions suggests that adult exposure also contributes to the development of melanoma. This observation is consistent with a growing body of evidence from multiple epidemiologic studies.2, 8-9 Obviously, this individual also has genetic predisposition to developing melanoma, which may have affected the length of the latency. Data from transgenic mouse models suggest that in genetically susceptible mice irradiated as neonates, deficiency of ink4a/arf decreases the latency of melanomas.10-11 It is clear from studies of high-risk families with mutations in CDKN2A, however, that additional factors affect risk of melanoma.12-14 Our findings represent observations from a single patient, and it would be inappropriate to generalize to all genetically susceptible patients or to the general population. However, this case illustrates that intense adult UV exposure may be important in high-risk individuals. It is unusual for such people under close surveillance to have artificial UV exposures as described herein. We believe that this report could be a useful illustration for health care providers in educating high-risk individuals. " 5th Link: This link tells us absolutely nothing until they state which UV articles they gathered their information from. Maybe the previous 4 links were used which would make it flawed. Regardless that link is not a link to a scientific study either. 6th Link: It is late and I have to get some shut eye. I will research it further but already I see two things one that it was a sytematic review and meta-analysis of other studies and significant heterogeneity between studies was present. I am still searching for an unbiased unflawed scientific study that says moderate tanning causes melanoma. I've been searching for 4 years. Thanks for sharing all the same.. I appreciate it.
DJM-DE DJM-DE 8 years
My posts won't work. I have a response for all 6 links but I'm not sure how to share them here. Is there a limit to what I can post?
DJM-DE DJM-DE 8 years
JulieJulie I'm going to try to respond to your links. 1st Link: "Patients with a history of melanoma were significantly more likely to report tanning bed sessions exceeding 20 min (P < 0.01; OR, 3.18; 95% CI, 1.48-6.82);" Most salons today don't even offer tanning sessions in excess of 20 minutes. They also didn't report if the patients tanned in moderation. It appears that was a survey done by dermatologists.
DJM-DE DJM-DE 8 years
JulieJulie I'm going to try to respond to your links. 1st Link: "Patients with a history of melanoma were significantly more likely to report tanning bed sessions exceeding 20 min (P < 0.01; OR, 3.18; 95% CI, 1.48-6.82);" Most salons today don't even offer tanning sessions in excess of 20 minutes. They also didn't report if the patients tanned in moderation. It appears that was a survey done by dermatologists. 2nd Link: That is the same group of studies the WHO uses. Are you aware they only selected the studies where those interviewed were never asked if they had previous sunburns so these studies are not complete or reliable. 3rd Link: If you dig deeper into the details of the study you'll find this: "The ratio of UVB to UVA emitted by indoor tanning devices was greatly reduced around 1980.24,27,28 We did not differentiate age category or calendar year of the usage of indoor tanning devices on the questionnaire. Because the age of our study population at baseline (1976) ranged from 30 to 55, it is possible that the majority in this study was of older UVB-emitting devices." 4th Link: This is not a scientific study it was an observation and conclusion made by dermatologists. Once again dig deeper into the actual findings of this study and you will find this person had a genetic link to melanoma. Here is the important paragraph you missed: "This individual had substantial sun exposure prior to the tanning bed exposure. He is thus very similar to many individuals using tanning parlors. Those who exhibit sun-seeking behavior will always have complex exposures with mixes of different UV action spectra.3-4,7 It is virtually impossible to precisely quantify total life exposure, but routine tanning bed use over many months represents an intense burst of UV exposure. Rapid change in multiple nevi and the development of new lesions shortly after this are likely related to activation of the melanocytic system. Although early sun exposure is important generally in the development of melanoma,1 and was specifically in this individual (since he developed his first melanoma at age 15 years), the short latency of these reported lesions suggests that adult exposure also contributes to the development of melanoma. This observation is consistent with a growing body of evidence from multiple epidemiologic studies.2, 8-9 Obviously, this individual also has genetic predisposition to developing melanoma, which may have affected the length of the latency. Data from transgenic mouse models suggest that in genetically susceptible mice irradiated as neonates, deficiency of ink4a/arf decreases the latency of melanomas.10-11 It is clear from studies of high-risk families with mutations in CDKN2A, however, that additional factors affect risk of melanoma.12-14 Our findings represent observations from a single patient, and it would be inappropriate to generalize to all genetically susceptible patients or to the general population. However, this case illustrates that intense adult UV exposure may be important in high-risk individuals. It is unusual for such people under close surveillance to have artificial UV exposures as described herein. We believe that this report could be a useful illustration for health care providers in educating high-risk individuals. " 5th Link: This link tells us absolutely nothing until they state which UV articles they gathered their information from. Maybe the previous 4 links were used which would make it flawed. Regardless that link is not a link to a scientific study either. 6th Link: It is late and I have to get some shut eye. I will research it further but already I see two things one that it was a sytematic review and meta-analysis of other studies and significant heterogeneity between studies was present. I am still searching for an unbiased unflawed scientific study that says moderate tanning causes melanoma. I've been searching for 4 years. Thanks for sharing all the same.. I appreciate it.
belletrist9 belletrist9 8 years
Although I am extremely saddened by this propaganda blitz, I am at the same time heartened, because I imagine that the tanning salons wouldn't resort to this unless they've experienced legal or financial difficulties. This is most likely their backlash to people really getting the word out on using sunscreen, the fashion/cosmetic industry's recent change of attitude about fairer-skinned models and less bronzer, and the plethora of sunless tanning products that have also entered the market (like in the last year alone!). However, it is also true that the FDA only regulates UVB protection in sunscreens and many on the market don't do as good a job as they should. So, the increase in skin cancer cases is most likely because people are spending more time in the sun, less covered up, using a sunscreen they think works, that actually doesn't. Skin Deep (search cosmetics database in Google) has a great guide to sunscreens that shows their UVA/UVB protection spectrum (although I wouldn't necessarily take everything they say without a grain of salt).
belletrist9 belletrist9 8 years
First, I am an undergraduate bioengineering student at the University of California, San Diego and I have been involved in many different angles of cancer research since I was in 7th grade. Most recently, last summer, I spent 9 weeks at the Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center at OSU developing targeted lipopolyplex nanoparticles to knock-in miRNA-15 and 16 for downregulation of Bcl-1 in chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells, in vitro, for cancer treatment. My cv is available at catherineshi.com and believe me when I say I have fully done my background research for all the projects listed on it, and then some. Juliejulie, you are amazing. Kiwisweet is wrong and Engfant - there is indisputable evidence that DNA damage induces the formation of cancerous growths. There is indisputable evidence that exposure to UV rays damages DNA in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, while there may be no hard and fast line for concluding something like if you use a tanning bed x amount of times for x period of time for a duration of x minutes each time you will get skin cancer, it's pretty hard to argue against if you keep damaging your DNA, you are MORE LIKELY to get cancer. Please keep reading for a more detailed explanation. We "scientists" don't typically post our sources because 1. they're usually scientific papers you wouldn't read and 2. even if you tried, the general population wouldn't be able to make head or tails of it, so instead, we try to explain in laymen's terms. This is not meant as an insult, I am only stating a fact - we have trouble reading papers outside our immediate fields too. Tanning is the production of more melanin pigment by your skin cells as a result of direct DNA damage - that is, your body recognizes the damage done by UV rays and tries to make it harder for them to penetrate into the nuclei of your skin cells to damage more DNA. Burning happens when UV rays cause inflammation of the skin, which can indirectly lead to DNA damage. The damage of DNA is when changes in the sequence of base pairs from mutation or loss cause a change in the sequence of amino acids that make up the protein, or encode a "STOP codon" so the protein is literally cut short. This makes the protein either less functional, not functional, or detrimental to its original function (whether that be the aforementioned p53, any other protein that the particular section of DNA that mutated encodes for, mutations/losses can also occur in small interfering and microRNAs such as miRNA-15 and 16). When these proteins or RNAs have the function of tumor suppression or play some role in the pathway of apoptosis (programmed cell death, which is normal), that is when a cell can become cancerous (i.e. it no longer undergoes apoptosis and just keeps multiplying). There are many, many other things that cause DNA damage which can lead to cancer, notably, some compounds in cigarette smoke, polyaromatic hydrocarbons (i.e. the charred part of burned meat), etc. Typically, your body's immune system and DNA repair mechanisms are good enough at fixing DNA before cells become cancerous and rooting out the cells that do become cancerous in your body before they become a full-fledged cancerous growths (this actually happens more frequently than you may imagine, just like tiny blood clots are digested by phagocytes before they cause problems most of the time) and there is ample evidence that shows that while your immune system fights the cancer at first, it sort of "gives up" at a certain point. The study of tumor immunology is all about figuring out why your body lets some cancers happen, and was the subject of the first research lab I worked in, under Dr. Pan Zheng and Dr. Yang Liu at the Ohio State University 7 years ago. There are currently some really brilliant people working on methods of "reawakening" your immune system to fight cancer again. Anyway, the point is DNA damage is bad and is what causes non-hereditary cancers (and can also trigger cancers that occur with hereditary predisposition). Therefore, frequent tanning is worse than burning because direct DNA damage is worse than indirect DNA damage (but burning is basically your body's defense mechanism of telling you to get out of the sun because you've had too much sun exposure) even though neither is good for you. Yes, there is also a very small rate of random DNA mutation in all people (I believe it's about 1 random mutation in 10 million cell divisions or something similar, but remember, you're made up of about a trillion cells) and therefore, everyone, regardless of their skin color or genetic makeup are at some risk for cancer. However, exposing yourself to increased quantities of DNA-mutagenizing agents (such as UV light) will increase the damage done to the DNA in your cells. The more DNA is damaged, the higher chance that your DNA repair mechanisms and immune system will miss fixing/killing one of those damaged cells. The more of these cells you have, the more likely one of them has a mutation in which one of those cell death or tumor suppression proteins is affected and the more likely you are to develop skin cancer. If you are fair-skinned, you have less melanin pigment and therefore less protection from UV light than darker-skinned people. Therefore, UV light penetrates your cells at a higher rate and causes more mutations. So, no one is saying that if you tan, you will get skin cancer. I am sure that there are people who have tanned weekly their entire lives who haven't gotten skin cancer, just like my grandfather smoked his entire life and didn't get lung cancer. However, by increasing the number of DNA mutations in your body, you increase your chances for developing cancer. You increase your RISK. So basically... it's kind of like playing Russian roulette and putting another bullet in the gun every time you spin the barrel.
Beauty Beauty 8 years
Even though some people who earn their income from tanning beds would like us to believe otherwise, there is a very strong correlation between sun/uv exposure and melanoma. Furthermore, as many of you have pointed out, tanning makes your skin look old. So if you want to increase your chances of developing skin cancer, or you really love sun spots and premature aging, by all means, head to a tanning bed. If you value your health, make SPF your friend.
taratootie taratootie 8 years
P.S. Tell him to watch a Rosenberg documentary (he tries to use viruses and ILs to make the body attack its cancer), and tell me how many people with metastatic melanoma were sunny peeps... yeah about 90%.
taratootie taratootie 8 years
Julieulie, you are kind of my hero! I have some experience with cancer literature research. I am getting my masters, def nowhere near PhD amounts of reading though! BUT, you took the words right out of my mouth regarding whats-his-name with the RIDICULOUS info on tanning being good. Ummmm, if you have a Vit D deficiency take a freakin' multivitamin! Or eat some fish! And besides you really do only need 10 mins of sun a day to make enough Vit D! One more point is that the more melanin your skin has, the longer it takes for the UV rays to penetrate your skin and make Vit D, so tanning really only makes it more difficult for this Vit D process. For the rest of us pale people out there, Im good with my 10 mins of sun a day (which is enough b/c the sun can actually get through my skin) and my multi. There are sooooooo many other things you can do to prevent cancer or help your survival, I have NO IDEA why tanning is being touted as anti-cancer! Does smoking help aide brain cancer b/c it gives you peace of mind? No? Oh well, I though that the same line of thought could be applied here too. No? My mistake...
flutterpie flutterpie 8 years
"The number one risk factor for melanoma is an inability to tan; people who tan easily or have dark pigmentation are far less likely to develop the disease," says the study's senior author, David E. Fisher, MD, PhD, director of the Melanoma Program at Dana-Farber and a professor in pediatrics at Children's Hospital Boston. "This study suggests that p53, one of the best-known tumor-suppressor proteins in our body, has a powerful role in protecting us against sun damage in the skin." This is the gist of the harvard study that jim was talking about. so if you "tan easily" i.e you are olive skinned and not fair, then you have a protein in your skin that protects you againist skin cancer. if your irish (such as myself) you dont have that protein and are not protected againist skin cancer.
actorgirl21 actorgirl21 8 years
I am an esthetician and although I don't have any facts supporting weather or not the sun causes melanoma, I do know that the sun is the number one reason for pre-mature aging. I treat numerous women who worshiped the sun in their youth and are paying for it BIG time now. Their skin is sagging, leathery, and extremely wrinkly. A nip and a tuck is really the only thing going to help them once it gets to that point. So I don't know about anyone else, but I will continue to avoid long exposure to UV rays and spf, if for no other reason, my vanity.
ezliving_jim ezliving_jim 8 years
My response to julieulie was also flagged, apparently for posting links to the medical study "The Sun and the Epidemic of Melanoma: Myth on Myth!" by A. Bernard Ackerman, MD & Renata Joffe, MD. (Go look it up on Google. It's available for purchase on Ardor Scribendi.) I also posted a link to Dr. Ackerman's resume, in case julieulie wants to prepare to debate him. (I'm afraid it would not be a very sporting contest. My money is on Dr. Ackerman to win by a knockout in the first round.)
julieulie julieulie 8 years
Here are a few articles for your reading pleasure: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18173518?ordinalpos=5&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17131335?ordinalpos=15&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16943234?ordinalpos=20&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16618869?ordinalpos=23&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16354251?ordinalpos=29&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15767329?ordinalpos=37&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum Enjoy!
jessica888 jessica888 8 years
"I, personally, think tanning AND smoking should be illegal. It sickens me how much money we wind up paying to treat people who are doing things that THEY know causes cancer." Sugar and other unhealthy foods cause diabetes and heart disease - should we outlaw those things because insurance companies have to foot the bill? How about jogging, since avid joggers often have to get their knee and hip replacement surgeries? Denying people their civil liberties is not too bright a solution.
julieulie julieulie 8 years
DJM DE, I just posted a bunch of links from PubMed with related articles on melanoma and skin care risk, but because of all the links it was automatically flagged. Hopefully it will be pushed through soon. Unfortunately for a lot of these you need subscriptions but if you cannot access them, send me a message and I can email you the PDF file.
engfant engfant 8 years
So funny when you read stuff like "tanning beds are SO dangerous" and from someone that claims to be a scientist to respond with such a elementary response. Tanning is so dangerous to whom? Where is the evidence of this? In science class we learned that you start with a hypothesis and then ran tests to see if that hypothesis was valid or not. These days we start with a hypothesis and then build a study around it to PROVE it. Not the same thing. So I ask you, if tanning beds are so bad where are the numbers showing this? Have you ever even tested a tanning bed yourself with UV meters "scientist" or are you repeating wive's tales? If you look at the numbers, skin cancer goes UP not DOWN since the pushing of SPF creams started. Again, this "scientist" would know from high school lab that if the evidence shows otherwise you don't "cover it up" you rework the lab and work with the new findings to actually come to a conclusion NOT "oh well we did see some slight evidence that it might cause free radicals so let's start putting people out of business based on that". That's stupid and again AT WORST you are talking about a couple thousand people a year die from "skin cancer". How many of those are tanning bed related? 6? 100? Are you saying that an entire industry should be put out of work for the sake of a handful of humans? Are you all nuts? How many of you drive a car? Talk on the phone while driving? Well in 2005 there were 6,420,000 car accidents. 6 MILLION IN ONE YEAR. And you want to destroy the economy even more than it already is for the sake of a handful that fall under the friendly heading that the medical industry uses to get away with killing X amount of people to save a whole lot more STATISTICALLY INSIGNIFICANT. Out of 300million people in the country there is X% that will drop dead from the most extreme and/or unusual circumstances and this number falls WILL within that small %. People falling out of bed and dying, hit by an asteroid, drowning from drinking too much water, suffocating from breathing too hard. These are the types of things you people are crowing about. Small numbers of unfortunates that no matter who you want to "pay" for their demise just won't help. Maybe it's time that everyone actually got up and went to work? Maybe you wouldn't be so worried nothing? You would think you'd start with something obvious like SKY DIVING or something like an EATING CONTEST cause no one in the US is overweight. Another small number...like 50% of the population. What? You aren't worried about a small number like 150MILLION? Yeah, focus on tanning. That's where life's problems start and end. (I still think it's funny that this person claims to be a "scientist"! Yeah, I'm J. Christ. Nice to meet you!)
DJM-DE DJM-DE 8 years
julieulie if your are a scientist can you please lgive us a link to this unflawed scientific study that shows tanning beds are directly linked to melanoma like you claim? That would give us something to go on besides an opinion only. :)
julieulie julieulie 8 years
"There isn't a causal relationship between tanning and melanoma skin cancer. That's science, not misinformation or propaganda." Actually, Jim, that's not science that's flat out false, lying, bullshit. I'm a scientist. I can tell the difference. Where did you get your MD/Ph.D.? How many years have you been a PI at the NCI? Or do you just happen to be an uneducated, money-hungry tanning salon owner? Just curious.
ezliving_jim ezliving_jim 8 years
I am stunned by all the misinformation, anecdote and propaganda that is posted here in the comments section. First of all, indoor tanning does not cause melanoma. Secondly, most of the population is vitamin D deficient and cancers associated with vitamin D deficiency kill 60,000 people a year. A tanning bed has never killed a single person. The website www.sunlightscam.com busts the AADA and several groups including the Melanoma Foundation for publicizing misinformation and propaganda. This has caused a lot of folks to steam and fume. Nobody likes to get busted. Doctors who tell melanoma patients that they got their skin cancer as a result of their own behavior (tanning) are irresponsible. It is just not their fault. It is wrong to blame the victim. The #1 precursor for melanoma is a family history of skin cancer; it is genetic. Melanoma patients were likely to get skin cancer, no matter what they did. There isn't a causal relationship between tanning and melanoma skin cancer. That's science, not misinformation or propaganda. Nobody is advocating over-exposure (sunburning) or excessive exposure (so-called tanorexia). However, moderate exposure to UV light in a tanning bed is healthy behavior. It will cure a vitamin D deficiency. And most people who tan will tell you it makes them look and feel better. There is nothing wrong with that. Many people are more inclined to believe a doctor, considered an authority figure by society. My suggestion is that adults should be proactive about their health and do their research. Adults are fully capable of making a decision whether or not to tan. Doctors are not infallible and they have their own biases. Keep in mind, approximately 100,000 people die every year from doctor's medical mistakes. This statistic only includes the unfortunate deaths from documented medical mistakes in a hospital setting. It doesn't include the 60,000 other deaths from vitamin D deficiency that could have been prevented by regular moderate exposure to UV light in a tanning bed. Have a nice tan!
blue-skies blue-skies 8 years
Uh, in high school I had friends who were obsessed with being tan and looking "healthy" and they never looked very natural. I'll never forget the day my friend came to school with tiny, tiny blisters all over her face because she had been in a tanning bed for too long. It didn't really show unless you looked really close but it was not very nice, she was in pain! Though I got that it was stupid and would never have done it before that, that incident really made me think of how much the skin is just "fried" and it grossed me out.I tan very easily in summer, even if I never just lie outside to get tan, and use sunblock. It's just in my family. My complexion and natural hair colour etc mean I look so much better with a bit of a tan (A BIT of a tan, not Lohan territory! Orange = not hot) Now, I use body lotion with a hint of self-tan to get a nice glow. It works perfectly, isn't (what I know) at all harmful and looks really natural. Tanning beds = So unnecessar. Why put yourself at risk?
blue-skies blue-skies 8 years
Uh, in high school I had friends who were obsessed with being tan and looking "healthy" and they never looked very natural. I'll never forget the day my friend came to school with tiny, tiny blisters all over her face because she had been in a tanning bed for too long. It didn't really show unless you looked really close but it was not very nice, she was in pain! Though I got that it was stupid and would never have done it before that, that incident really made me think of how much the skin is just "fried" and it grossed me out. I tan very easily in summer, even if I never just lie outside to get tan, and use sunblock. It's just in my family. My complexion and natural hair colour etc mean I look so much better with a bit of a tan (A BIT of a tan, not Lohan territory! Orange = not hot) Now, I use body lotion with a hint of self-tan to get a nice glow. It works perfectly, isn't (what I know) at all harmful and looks really natural. Tanning beds = So unnecessar. Why put yourself at risk?
RobinFabulous RobinFabulous 8 years
I tan from time to time, as I have seasonal depression and it really helps me. I don't over tan, I'm not orange. I worked at a Physical Therapy office and we had a tanning bed specifically for treatment of fibromyalgia. Say what you will, but it did help alleviate pain in a large portion of our patients.
RobinFabulous RobinFabulous 8 years
I tan from time to time, as I have seasonal depression and it really helps me. I don't over tan, I'm not orange.I worked at a Physical Therapy office and we had a tanning bed specifically for treatment of fibromyalgia. Say what you will, but it did help alleviate pain in a large portion of our patients.
running-home running-home 8 years
I agree with mondaymoos. It's sad that tanning causes cancer, but people CHOOSE to do it, as they do with smoking. We all know it causes cancer and have done for a long time now. It's not new news and if you decide to take that risk knowing what might happen to you, and it happens, it's no one else's fault but your own, especially in this day and age where information is jammed down your throat about it, like in those god awful anti-smoking ads (I want to scream if I hear that "It must have been a typo" one. I almost want to go and smoke to spite them...but that might be the point seeing as they're sponsored by Phillip Morris or some other big tobacco group, but I digress...)I get what Julieulie is saying, but it just made me feel like if you get cancer from tanning specifically, it shouldn't be covered by insurance. I know it's harsh, but once again, it's not like you're innocently tanning/smoking and don't know what the potential consequences are. You know that when you're doing it. It's your own fault. I know I'm going to get my head bitten off for this, and I'm sorry if I make people mad. I suppose it's more something that should go into effect with something like smoking where you know for sure that that is the cause. The trouble with making something small like tanning and smoking illegal is that it desensitizes people to having their civil liberties taken away to "protect them" and I'd rather not live in a place where I can't make my own choices.
running-home running-home 8 years
I agree with mondaymoos. It's sad that tanning causes cancer, but people CHOOSE to do it, as they do with smoking. We all know it causes cancer and have done for a long time now. It's not new news and if you decide to take that risk knowing what might happen to you, and it happens, it's no one else's fault but your own, especially in this day and age where information is jammed down your throat about it, like in those god awful anti-smoking ads (I want to scream if I hear that "It must have been a typo" one. I almost want to go and smoke to spite them...but that might be the point seeing as they're sponsored by Phillip Morris or some other big tobacco group, but I digress...) I get what Julieulie is saying, but it just made me feel like if you get cancer from tanning specifically, it shouldn't be covered by insurance. I know it's harsh, but once again, it's not like you're innocently tanning/smoking and don't know what the potential consequences are. You know that when you're doing it. It's your own fault. I know I'm going to get my head bitten off for this, and I'm sorry if I make people mad. I suppose it's more something that should go into effect with something like smoking where you know for sure that that is the cause. The trouble with making something small like tanning and smoking illegal is that it desensitizes people to having their civil liberties taken away to "protect them" and I'd rather not live in a place where I can't make my own choices.
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