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figandsage figandsage 5 years
Opps! Forgot to include the source: http://www.ecocert.com/en/natural-and-organic-cometics :)
figandsage figandsage 5 years
Many kudos to BellaSugar for putting together these concise and easy to understanding definitions! There are some important distinctions that should be made clear so that consumers are aware:The ECOCERT definition is slightly vague and a little unclear. It's important for consumers to be aware that there are two difference cosmetic certifications from ECOCERT:1). "Natural Cosmetic" certification: Requires that only 50% of the total ingredients are of natural origin or plant-based, which are usually entirely different from being a natural food grade ingredient (i.e. cocomidopropyl betain is "derived from coconuts" but it is synthetically treated and altered which doesn't make it "natural" anymore IMHO). Only 5% organic content is required for this cert. 2). "Organic Cosmetic" Certification: Requires that 95% of the total ingredients are of natural origin or plant-based (not necessarily "natural"), and ONLY 10% organic content is required. BTW: 10% organic content for any product is hardly enough to call it "organic". Stepping off of soapbox now...Hope this helps :)
figandsage figandsage 5 years
Many kudos to BellaSugar for putting together these concise and easy to understanding definitions! There are some important distinctions that should be made clear so that consumers are aware: The ECOCERT definition is slightly vague and a little unclear. It's important for consumers to be aware that there are two difference cosmetic certifications from ECOCERT: 1). "Natural Cosmetic" certification: Requires that only 50% of the total ingredients are of natural origin or plant-based, which are usually entirely different from being a natural food grade ingredient (i.e. cocomidopropyl betain is "derived from coconuts" but it is synthetically treated and altered which doesn't make it "natural" anymore IMHO). Only 5% organic content is required for this cert. 2). "Organic Cosmetic" Certification: Requires that 95% of the total ingredients are of natural origin or plant-based (not necessarily "natural"), and ONLY 10% organic content is required. BTW: 10% organic content for any product is hardly enough to call it "organic". Stepping off of soapbox now... Hope this helps :)
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