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Why Are Invisible Beauty Items Credited in Magazines?

Magazines can be indispensable in identifying trends, and while looking through any given issue, I usually spot some hair and makeup ideas. (On that note, Freja Beha in this month's W is so dreamy. Why can't I look that chic when tomboyed out?) It's easy to understand why editors leave credits for certain things: hair products, lipstick, nail polish. It's helpful to know which items are used on the models. Of course, what's listed is often not actually what's been used, but that's another story entirely.

Still, one thing I've never understood is the concept of crediting fragrances and skin care. For instance, the credits for this photo in W tell us, "A touch of 3Lab Perfect Neck Cream is just what an exposed decolletage needs." While I'm sure my exposed decolletage would like to be massaged with a $120 neck cream, I'm not sure I'd wonder about neck cream from looking at the photo. Mentioning fragrance in credits is even goofier to me, since unless you're the ghost of Tim Leary, you can't see scent. Are editors trying to be overly helpful? Is it a way of throwing an editorial bone to advertisers? Or am I the only one who overthinks this sort of thing?

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xemailheather xemailheather 7 years
Is it far-fetched to wish that ALL the products used to get the cover look are listed?
leslievanhouten leslievanhouten 7 years
Most magazines pimp out the cover look credits. You can usually tell if they use language like "recreate this look using XXXX" or "a similar look is XXX"
grlykool grlykool 7 years
dakmo- Me too!
grlykool grlykool 7 years
dakmo- Me too!
sarasonne sarasonne 7 years
Nice to know i'm not the only one who notices things like this, good call!
Meilily Meilily 7 years
Good point- I think it's a bit disingenuous for magazines to not be transparent enough in their product mentions. Given that the FTC just announced that they are cracking down on blogger endorsements that aren't clearly disclosed, I think disclosure should similarly be required of magazine editors if this is going to be the trend!
Beauty Beauty 7 years
OK, so: There are times when a makeup artist takes note of everything he or she uses, and then passes the info along to editors. But other times, the notes aren't there, or the makeup artist might specially mix a blend of makeup that consumers can't buy, or she might be using supplies that are available only to professionals. In those cases, an editor might try to find a duplicate of a color for the credit. Of course, sometimes there's advertiser pressure or contractual obligations. Take a look at the credits and then take a look at who's advertising. Or look at the actress/model on the cover, and consider whether she has an endorsement deal with Company X. If that's the case, even if a makeup artist used ABC Brand lipstick, it will be listed as a similar Company X shade — it's probably in the model/actress's contract. Also look at the credits carefully — sometimes they will say "you can recreate this look with these products," which feels more transparent to me.There are some credits that seem accurate, but you can't always tell. In that issue of W, they're definitely using Chanel Jade on the model's manicure, and they credit it as such. But I would be surprised if any issue of any magazine is completely accurate on the credits issue.
Beauty Beauty 7 years
OK, so: There are times when a makeup artist takes note of everything he or she uses, and then passes the info along to editors. But other times, the notes aren't there, or the makeup artist might specially mix a blend of makeup that consumers can't buy, or she might be using supplies that are available only to professionals. In those cases, an editor might try to find a duplicate of a color for the credit. Of course, sometimes there's advertiser pressure or contractual obligations. Take a look at the credits and then take a look at who's advertising. Or look at the actress/model on the cover, and consider whether she has an endorsement deal with Company X. If that's the case, even if a makeup artist used ABC Brand lipstick, it will be listed as a similar Company X shade — it's probably in the model/actress's contract. Also look at the credits carefully — sometimes they will say "you can recreate this look with these products," which feels more transparent to me. There are some credits that seem accurate, but you can't always tell. In that issue of W, they're definitely using Chanel Jade on the model's manicure, and they credit it as such. But I would be surprised if any issue of any magazine is completely accurate on the credits issue.
dancinlaughin01 dancinlaughin01 7 years
the advertisers probably paid the magazine to mention the neck creme. they also probably have a full page ad somewhere in the issue. i also think W magazine targets the wealthier classes. regardless, i definitely think its ridiculous!
snarkypants snarkypants 7 years
i third that motion!
snarkypants snarkypants 7 years
i third that motion!
polkadots567 polkadots567 7 years
i notice that alll the time too, and i second dakmo!
dakmo dakmo 7 years
Bella, I'd like to hear more about why what's actually being used is often different from what is listed?
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