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Chris Brown Pleads Not Gulty To Two Felonies

Chris Brown attended his hearing in LA this afternoon where he entered a plea of Not Guilty for his two felony charges — assault and making criminal threats. Over the weekend it was reported both sides are still trying to work out a plea bargain since Rihanna wants nothing to do with the case. She spent the weekend home in Barbados with her friends and family. Chris Brown's next court date is set for April 28.


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care0531 care0531 7 years
He is doing it all to try and salvage his career but regardless of the outcome that career is over.He would have a better chance of regaining fans by admitting that he has a problem- admitting he did wrong and step up and be a man and take responsibility for his actions.RiRi is no siant either- just trying to sweep it all under the carpet isn't going to help and I believe someone else already said it- it sets a horrible example for other young ladies who are in an abusive situation.
care0531 care0531 7 years
He is doing it all to try and salvage his career but regardless of the outcome that career is over. He would have a better chance of regaining fans by admitting that he has a problem- admitting he did wrong and step up and be a man and take responsibility for his actions. RiRi is no siant either- just trying to sweep it all under the carpet isn't going to help and I believe someone else already said it- it sets a horrible example for other young ladies who are in an abusive situation.
jaan_black jaan_black 7 years
I only wish I could've been outside the court with a bag of scolding hot nickels to hit him in the face...or maybe beat him with a sack of baked potatoes lmao....what a loser and Rihanna is an airhead
SeptemberRain SeptemberRain 7 years
just to put an end to the whole whos right thing on prosecuting someone without a witness----- i have to agree with jumpstart. runningesq, i also live in maryland and while I'm not an attorney, I do work as a paralegal for one here in germantown. The attorney I work for is my husband and we have followed the Chris Brown case as we are curious to see how it will go. The question: Can the State prosecute a domestic violence assault case without the victim cooperance in Maryland? (I'm using Maryland runningesq because that is the state I'm familiar with and you say you are a prosecutor) Any experienced criminal attorney in Maryland will tell you that the answer to this question is yes, at least in cases where the State has evidence other than the testimony of the alleged victim. (such as photos taken by police, and statements that were aquired on the scene by the police, just as jumpstart stated). In fact, in a non-domestic violence assault case that was recently decided by the Court of Appeals, Edmund v. State, the Court held that the State need not even identify the victim by name. The only requirement, according to the COA is that the victim be "substantially identified" even without the cooperation from the victim. http://mdcourts.gov/opinions/coa/2007/94a06.pdf It has been a very common situation where an alleged victim of domestic violence refuses to cooperate in the assault prosecution of her husband or boyfriend. This situation presents itself in courts across the State every day. Most domestic assaults occur in private and therefore most often there are no witnesses other than the victim and the defendant. In most cases, the State can introduce certain statements made to the police by the victim at the scene or to the 911 operator. These laws have changed in recent years because our technology has changed and is more accurate now. (ie: 911 phone calls) The State can introduce these out of court statement which, when coupled with observations and photographs of injury to the victim, can be sufficient for the State to secure a conviction. More commonly though are situations where there are so called "independent" witnesses to the incident. We have a case currently pending in Baltimore County Circuit Court that falls into this category. (too long to explain, but is almost identical to Chris Brown's case). In a nutshell, the alleged victim has refused to cooperate with the State and the State has been unable to subpoena her so it is unlikely that she will come to court. The only other evidence the State has is the testimony of a neighbor who claims to have witnessed him choking her which she says occurred outside of the apartment in the hallway. Many people wrongly believe that because the victim is not present in the court to testify that the State will not be able to prove the element of assault. The COA has ruled on many occasions that this type of information can be "inferred" just from the evidence that is presented. In the Edmund case, for example, the COA held that the jury could have inferred that the victim had been placed in fear by the fact that he was shot at five times at point blank range as well as the fact that he fled the area afterwards. So just because Rhianna has fled to Barbados, means nothing. They can still offer the photos and statements from the police and paramedics on the scene. The paramedics by the way are considered expert witnesses, so he's gonna have a hard time fighting how his fists slammed into her face on accident.
SeptemberRain SeptemberRain 7 years
just to put an end to the whole whos right thing on prosecuting someone without a witness-----i have to agree with jumpstart. runningesq, i also live in maryland and while I'm not an attorney, I do work as a paralegal for one here in germantown. The attorney I work for is my husband and we have followed the Chris Brown case as we are curious to see how it will go.The question:Can the State prosecute a domestic violence assault case without the victim cooperance in Maryland? (I'm using Maryland runningesq because that is the state I'm familiar with and you say you are a prosecutor)Any experienced criminal attorney in Maryland will tell you that the answer to this question is yes, at least in cases where the State has evidence other than the testimony of the alleged victim. (such as photos taken by police, and statements that were aquired on the scene by the police, just as jumpstart stated).In fact, in a non-domestic violence assault case that was recently decided by the Court of Appeals, Edmund v. State, the Court held that the State need not even identify the victim by name. The only requirement, according to the COA is that the victim be "substantially identified" even without the cooperation from the victim. http://mdcourts.gov/opinions/coa/2007/94a06.pdfIt has been a very common situation where an alleged victim of domestic violence refuses to cooperate in the assault prosecution of her husband or boyfriend. This situation presents itself in courts across the State every day. Most domestic assaults occur in private and therefore most often there are no witnesses other than the victim and the defendant. In most cases, the State can introduce certain statements made to the police by the victim at the scene or to the 911 operator. These laws have changed in recent years because our technology has changed and is more accurate now. (ie: 911 phone calls)The State can introduce these out of court statement which, when coupled with observations and photographs of injury to the victim, can be sufficient for the State to secure a conviction.More commonly though are situations where there are so called "independent" witnesses to the incident. We have a case currently pending in Baltimore County Circuit Court that falls into this category. (too long to explain, but is almost identical to Chris Brown's case).In a nutshell, the alleged victim has refused to cooperate with the State and the State has been unable to subpoena her so it is unlikely that she will come to court. The only other evidence the State has is the testimony of a neighbor who claims to have witnessed him choking her which she says occurred outside of the apartment in the hallway.Many people wrongly believe that because the victim is not present in the court to testify that the State will not be able to prove the element of assault. The COA has ruled on many occasions that this type of information can be "inferred" just from the evidence that is presented. In the Edmund case, for example, the COA held that the jury could have inferred that the victim had been placed in fear by the fact that he was shot at five times at point blank range as well as the fact that he fled the area afterwards.So just because Rhianna has fled to Barbados, means nothing. They can still offer the photos and statements from the police and paramedics on the scene. The paramedics by the way are considered expert witnesses, so he's gonna have a hard time fighting how his fists slammed into her face on accident.
ilanac13 ilanac13 7 years
regardless of what he says and what the outcome is, his 'stock' is still way down. no one wants to touch him, and that's just that. i feel like he's going to be out of the picture for a LONG time and it's a shame since he was on the rise big time
Briandiesel Briandiesel 7 years
On CNN it doesn't make it sound like Rihanna wants "nothing to do with the case." It does sound like she wants it to be over quickly but also her lawyers said that she would testify if they asked her to. Her lawyer also said it was "premature to speculate" what Rihanna might consider a fair plea deal for Brown. I think it's crazy that he pleaded not guilty. If you aren't guilty of it, then why did you apologize for it?
Briandiesel Briandiesel 7 years
On CNN it doesn't make it sound like Rihanna wants "nothing to do with the case." It does sound like she wants it to be over quickly but also her lawyers said that she would testify if they asked her to. Her lawyer also said it was "premature to speculate" what Rihanna might consider a fair plea deal for Brown.I think it's crazy that he pleaded not guilty. If you aren't guilty of it, then why did you apologize for it?
simplystella simplystella 7 years
@ zeze: ditto. Looks like someone from his staff decided to do his job and released an apology statement - then he/she was fired or something. Chris Brown has seriously re-defined the meaning of "douche bag" As for Rihanna.. oh well. I'm not going to judge her - this is one of those situation where you really can't tell for sure how would you act, until you find yourself involved. Yet, cooperating with police/attorneys to get him where he deserves to stay wouldn't be a bad idea. Just saying!
simplystella simplystella 7 years
@ zeze: ditto. Looks like someone from his staff decided to do his job and released an apology statement - then he/she was fired or something. Chris Brown has seriously re-defined the meaning of "douche bag"As for Rihanna.. oh well. I'm not going to judge her - this is one of those situation where you really can't tell for sure how would you act, until you find yourself involved. Yet, cooperating with police/attorneys to get him where he deserves to stay wouldn't be a bad idea. Just saying!
mod16 mod16 7 years
ugh. this makes me hate people
Rouge-Noir Rouge-Noir 7 years
Jumpstart, with all due respect, I sympathize with your story, but it sounds like what you're presenting is anecdotal evidence. I'm more inclined to go with Runningesq in this matter, since she is in fact a trained prosecutor and not a layperson like you. However, I wish you were right. The world would be a better place if the perpetrators in domestic violence cases got the help they need and punishment they deserve - no matter if the victim cooperates or not.
Rouge-Noir Rouge-Noir 7 years
Jumpstart, with all due respect, I sympathize with your story, but it sounds like what you're presenting is anecdotal evidence. I'm more inclined to go with Runningesq in this matter, since she is in fact a trained prosecutor and not a layperson like you. However, I wish you were right. The world would be a better place if the perpetrators in domestic violence cases got the help they need and punishment they deserve - no matter if the victim cooperates or not.
jumpstart2 jumpstart2 7 years
runningeque What you are saying is completely false. (that a case gets droped if the victim doesn't show up for court or refuses to press charges) The state presses charges if the victim refuses to. (in most states now) I went through a case in Portland, OR (4 yrs ago) where the wife refused to press charges at the last minute. You should know that once photos are taken of the victim by police THAT IS EVIDENCE..a Prosecutor will throw everything they have at the accused to win a case. How do I know this so well..because I WAS THE WIFE. Even though I pulled back everything I initially said. the judge still saw the pictures and read the reports...it wasn't too hard to figure out how I got the bruises on my face. My husband was found guilty (with no help from me). You're saying that charges get dropped if the victim doesn't show up for court and I"m telling you THAT IS NOT TRUE. There are laws in place now so things like that DO NOT HAPPEN because it happened so often years ago. The mentality has changed concerning domestic violence now. It is not over looked like it once was. Going to court about my husband turned out it was the best thing that happened to our family..he went through a court ordered anger management course and other classes (benefiting the family unit)...It's been 4 yrs, he was on probation for 2 yrs because he had a clean record before this happened and graduated top in his class from an Ivy league college..it was very out of character for him to act the way he did. The judge did not want to ruin our family life and gave him another chance. Even with me asking the Judge to let him come back home to the family..he still made him go to an inpatient treatment center for anger management for 6 weeks. He had to go through numerous interviews with many different people and that included a psychiatrist,a psychologist, a therapist, a counselor, and a member of the clergy before he was allowed to live in the home again. All of the people on the panel had to approve him being part of the family again before he was allowed to. He learned something about himself with each person he encountered. The decision finally came down to the judge alone because his attorney told him he didn't want to go through a jury because statistically the jury usually finds against the accuser. He learned in anger management how to deal with stressers and how his negative actions affect the whole family. He hasn't lost his temper since that day in October and he said he has learned so much that he never even considered before. The system worked in this case which I'm thankful. There are the ones who slip through the cracks..I hope that Chris Brown is not one of those for the sake of the girl friends he will have in the future. Chris needs to learn about himself and why he reacted the way he did..not run from his problems.
jumpstart2 jumpstart2 7 years
runningequeWhat you are saying is completely false. (that a case gets droped if the victim doesn't show up for court or refuses to press charges)The state presses charges if the victim refuses to. (in most states now)I went through a case in Portland, OR (4 yrs ago) where the wife refused to press charges at the last minute. You should know that once photos are taken of the victim by police THAT IS EVIDENCE..a Prosecutor will throw everything they have at the accused to win a case. How do I know this so well..because I WAS THE WIFE. Even though I pulled back everything I initially said. the judge still saw the pictures and read the reports...it wasn't too hard to figure out how I got the bruises on my face. My husband was found guilty (with no help from me). You're saying that charges get dropped if the victim doesn't show up for court and I"m telling you THAT IS NOT TRUE. There are laws in place now so things like that DO NOT HAPPEN because it happened so often years ago. The mentality has changed concerning domestic violence now. It is not over looked like it once was. Going to court about my husband turned out it was the best thing that happened to our family..he went through a court ordered anger management course and other classes (benefiting the family unit)...It's been 4 yrs, he was on probation for 2 yrs because he had a clean record before this happened and graduated top in his class from an Ivy league college..it was very out of character for him to act the way he did. The judge did not want to ruin our family life and gave him another chance. Even with me asking the Judge to let him come back home to the family..he still made him go to an inpatient treatment center for anger management for 6 weeks. He had to go through numerous interviews with many different people and that included a psychiatrist,a psychologist, a therapist, a counselor, and a member of the clergy before he was allowed to live in the home again. All of the people on the panel had to approve him being part of the family again before he was allowed to. He learned something about himself with each person he encountered. The decision finally came down to the judge alone because his attorney told him he didn't want to go through a jury because statistically the jury usually finds against the accuser. He learned in anger management how to deal with stressers and how his negative actions affect the whole family. He hasn't lost his temper since that day in October and he said he has learned so much that he never even considered before. The system worked in this case which I'm thankful. There are the ones who slip through the cracks..I hope that Chris Brown is not one of those for the sake of the girl friends he will have in the future. Chris needs to learn about himself and why he reacted the way he did..not run from his problems.
ShelleyHFan ShelleyHFan 7 years
It's just stupid to be upset Rihanna and say she is setting a "bad example" it's (technically) not her responsibility and if she isn't being just flighty, and has been manipulated than she is only acting like so many other victims do. A victim of domestic abuse isn't their own person...it takes years for someone to get back to an average life.
ShelleyHFan ShelleyHFan 7 years
It's just stupid to be upset Rihanna and say she is setting a "bad example" it's (technically) not her responsibility and if she isn't being just flighty, and has been manipulated than she is only acting like so many other victims do.A victim of domestic abuse isn't their own person...it takes years for someone to get back to an average life.
brielleblonde brielleblonde 7 years
i am by no means defending chris brown at all, but I thought Rihanna also hit him too... maybe this was just rumors going around, and that's still doesn't make what he did right AT ALL, but I'm just saying...
La-Tua-Cantante La-Tua-Cantante 7 years
What a disgusting peice of crap. He can't even own up to what EVERYBODY knows he did. And Rihanna definitely needs to rethink this, not just because it sets a bad example for girls. For herself - wouldn't she like to see some justice? I hope he gets what's coming to him.
sillyho sillyho 7 years
What a sodding git. Doesn't matter his career is over anyway.
silversnowflake silversnowflake 7 years
This is just really sad. How far back does society jump when things like this happen? Both of those... children are horrible role models.
silversnowflake silversnowflake 7 years
This is just really sad. How far back does society jump when things like this happen? Both of those... children are horrible role models.
nylorac nylorac 7 years
by denying his own responsibility he is clearing showing how despicable he is. i can't stand this guy let alone ever support his music again.
runningesq runningesq 7 years
Jumpstart, are you an attorney? Do you practice criminal law - on either side of the aisle? Have you ever dealt with a Judge or a jury? I don't know what state you are a prosecutor at but your way of thinking is a very OLD one - Maryland The laws have changed and abusers just don't get off the hook now because a victim changes her story, refuses to testify, or doesn't show up..that doens't hold water or else most people would be getting off and thankfully now that these laws have changed, abusers are getting jail time at an all time high now. Perhaps, but you know what hasn't changed? The Constition. The burden still rests with the State to prove - beyond a reseason. doubt - that the Def. both committed and intended to commit the crime. The Defense can sit back and do nothing or it can put on a case. the burden isn't on them. also, in Oregon and most other states, photos and police statments are all that is needed..the procecutor just informs the judge that the witness is now being uncooperative and the judge then switches to photos, reports, and police testimony for the remainder of the trial.... This is what makes you think you are not an attorney. The judge doesn't JUST SWITCH TO PHOTOS -- the prosecution has to INTRODUCE EVIDENCE to prove the Def. guilty BEYOND A REASONABLE DBOUT. There are rules to evidence -- you don't just throw in photos and statements willy nilly. Yes, you can use photos and statements, but the statements must be admissible hearsay if the victim or another declarant is not present in court. The defendant has an absolute right to confront his accuser, which is why hearsay is not admissible unless it falls under an exception such as excited utterance, statement of a party opponent, statement for medical purposes, etc. where are you a prosecutor that you don't know these simple laws that have been in place now for over 5 yrs? Again, Maryland. One of my co workers just successfuly proved a domestic violence assault by impeaching his own wis with her prior inconsistent statements. It's possible, of course, but it's difficult. And with juries --- well, they often think if the victim doesn't care enough to show up, why should WE care? Of COURSE the victim has reasons not to show - fear, afraid of losing her children's father, need him to provide for the family, etc. but often juries don't know or understand this. Until you have prosecuted DVs and dealt with victims and judges and juries don't tell me I don't know about simple laws. ... especially when you don't KNOW the laws in MY STATE.
runningesq runningesq 7 years
Jumpstart, are you an attorney? Do you practice criminal law - on either side of the aisle? Have you ever dealt with a Judge or a jury?<i>I don't know what state you are a prosecutor at but your way of thinking is a very OLD one</i> - Maryland<i>The laws have changed and abusers just don't get off the hook now because a victim changes her story, refuses to testify, or doesn't show up..that doens't hold water or else most people would be getting off and thankfully now that these laws have changed, abusers are getting jail time at an all time high now.</i>Perhaps, but you know what hasn't changed? The Constition. The burden still rests with the State to prove - beyond a reseason. doubt - that the Def. both committed and intended to commit the crime. The Defense can sit back and do nothing or it can put on a case. the burden isn't on them.<i>also, in Oregon and most other states, photos and police statments are all that is needed..the procecutor just informs the judge that the witness is now being uncooperative and the judge then switches to photos, reports, and police testimony for the remainder of the trial...</i>.This is what makes you think you are not an attorney. The judge doesn't <b>JUST SWITCH TO PHOTOS</b> -- the prosecution has to INTRODUCE EVIDENCE to prove the Def. guilty BEYOND A REASONABLE DBOUT. There are <b>rules</b> to evidence -- you don't just throw in photos and statements willy nilly.Yes, you can use photos and statements, but the statements must be <b>admissible hearsay</b> if the victim or another declarant is not present in court. The defendant has an absolute right to confront his accuser, which is why hearsay is not admissible unless it falls under an exception such as excited utterance, statement of a party opponent, statement for medical purposes, etc.<i>where are you a prosecutor that you don't know these simple laws that have been in place now for over 5 yrs?</i> Again, Maryland.One of my co workers just successfuly proved a domestic violence assault by impeaching his own wis with her prior inconsistent statements. It's possible, of course, but it's difficult.And with juries --- well, they often think <i>if the victim doesn't care enough to show up, why should WE care?</i> Of COURSE the victim has reasons not to show - fear, afraid of losing her children's father, need him to provide for the family, etc. but often juries don't know or understand this.Until you have prosecuted DVs and dealt with victims and judges and juries don't tell me I don't know about <u>simple laws.</u> ... especially when you don't KNOW the laws in MY STATE.
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