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Buzz Book Club: Four Blondes


Hello Buzz Book Club readers! First of all, happy Friday! Now, I don't know about you, but I'm feeling a little emotionally spent from several Buzz Book Club books in a row that dragged us through the emotional ringer (Revolutionary Road, The Life Before Her Eyes).

Given that and the fact that it's Springtime, I thought I'd pick a light and frothy book for my May selection: Four Blondes by Candace Bushnell (author of Sex and the City).

It also seems appropriate, since we've had Bushnell's Lipstick Jungle on the small screen this year, and the Sex and the City movie is on the way to the big screen. So we might as well get into the spirit of the sassy, high-powered woman by reading Four Blondes.

For those of you new to my book club format, here's how it works:
I'll announce a new book each month. Every week I'll suggest chapters to complete by the next post (which, in this case, will go up every Friday in May). In these weekly Book Club posts, I'll posit a few discussion-provoking questions for you to respond to in the comments section.

To find out what Four Blondes is all about and to get the first assignment, read more.

The synopsis for Four Blondes reads:
"In Four Blondes, [Candace Bushnell] returns with a quartet of novellas on her favorite subject — the mating habits of wealthy sex-, status-, and media-obsessed New Yorkers. These are people for whom a million or two does not make one rich, and who consider Louis Vuitton and Prada bare necessities. Janey Wilcox, for example, is a former model who each summer chooses a house in the Hamptons — or, rather, picks up a wealthy man with a pricey rental. Cecelia, on the other hand, has gotten the ultimate prize: a royal husband. Still, she finds herself descending into paranoia as the Manhattan media circus reports her every flaw. Then there's Winnie Diekes, a high-powered magazine columnist whose marriage flounders as she pushes her unambitious husband to write the book that will make him — and her — famous. Finally, in the most clearly autobiographical story, a writer gives up on the commitment-impaired men of New York and goes to London to find a husband."

The first assignment: Read the entire first story title, "Nice N'Easy." We'll chat about this first section a week from today, May 9.

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