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Buzz Book Club: Important Artifacts and Personal Property . . . Section Two

Hey, Buzz Book Club readers, how's this month's book treating you? It's getting a little emotionally intense for me. It's just so realistic the way this book portrays tensions in a relationship that we already know ends. It's hard not to think back on breakups I've experienced and not cringe a little. Then again, that's the job of a good book, isn't it?

Here's a recap of how the Book Club goes: Every week I'll suggest chapters to complete by the next post (which, in this case, will go up every Friday in April). In these weekly Book Club posts, I'll posit a few questions to prompt discussion in the comments section.

Of course, you are always welcome to read beyond the weekly chapters, but please don't spoil anything in the comments! After the jump you'll find some questions that struck me as I read this section.

The next section: Read LOT 1226 through the end. We'll chat about the conclusion a week from today, April 24.

To discuss last week's section of Important Artifacts, in which we read from LOT 1113 through LOT 1225,

.

  1. I've been noticing that the pricing on the items up for auction holds pretty closely to the way we value things traditionally — the vintage clothing is priced much higher than a piece of paper with a love note on it, for example. I suppose that's the way it would be if an uninvolved third party tried to assign value to my things, though, because it's harder to judge how much the personal things mean. Has anything struck you as particularly overvalued in the book? Or undervalued? I'd pay way more for the little notes they write on theater programs.
  2. Have you ever bought other peoples' personal items — from yard sales and the like — that have no actual value to you, but that you simply found interesting, like yearbooks or old photographs of other peoples' families?
  3. I wish I'd thought of those hand-painted Valentine's menus — and now I kind of want to steal that idea! Are there any touches from their lives that you'd wish you'd thought of first or that you want to incorporate into your own life?
  4. I'm coming to love both of these people, but sometimes they just seem precious and maybe even a little pretentious. Do you think you could be friends with either of them? Or would they drive you batty?
  5. The fight where Hal tells Lenore he's sick of cake rang true to me, because it seemed like the kind of argument you can only have when you know someone well enough to push all their buttons. Have you had that sort of fight before? Can relationships ever recover from those?
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fireyelectra fireyelectra 6 years
On point number five, that fight struck an entirely different memory for me. When my husband and I met in a screenwriting class, we were reading a classmate's script aloud, with him in the role of the recently unemployed boyfriend and me in the role of the woman supporting him. My character was trying to bring a little levity to the situation by purchasing him a cake, for no reason other than to have cake. They have this fight because he can't take her teasing anymore, and it eventually gets to the point where his character snaps at mine and says, "All I want in this world is my job and a piece of f***ing cake." Heartbroken, my character responds, "In the whole world, that's all you want?" Morris and Doolan's fight when he tells her he's sick of cake reminds me entirely of that moment in the script I mentioned above. Yes, what Morris does for a living is trivial, but it makes people happy and it is who she is. She's supposed to be his Buttertart, and for him to say he's sick of cake is like being sick of something essential to her being. That's a pretty hard thing to get over, and I don't think Morris and Doolan ever do.
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