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CD Review: Explosions in the Sky, All of a Sudden I Miss Everyone


Explosions in the Sky convey all of the vastness of Texas with none of the twang. In fact, the Texas quartet's stirring and soaring instrumental music — which often serves as the soundtrack to the "Friday Night Lights" series and the preceding movie — sounds more like Iceland's Sigur Ros or Canada's Godspeed You Black Emperor! than anything ever to come out of the Lone Star state.

As compared to albums by its instrumental-rock peers, the band's All of a Sudden I Miss Everyone, which comes out today, is more orchestral than experimental and more triumphant than dreary. To hear more of my take and a track off the album, read more

Maybe its my background as a writer, but it often takes a lot for lyric-less music to win me over. But the six songs on this sweeping LP have what it takes — such as poetic guitar duets and silvery piano melodies woven together into a palpable tension, which is usually unleashed in some sort of crushing crescendo full of symbol crashes and melodrama.

As with a symphony, it makes more sense to listen to this album as a unified arc, rather than as individual songs. In lieu of catchy hooks and killer one-liners, you get startling progressions culminating in ponder-inducing moments of release that will give you chills. "The Birth and Death of the Day," for instance, starts like a lullaby then morphs into a footrace between gnashing metal-edged guitars and frantic snares before circling back to its original touching melody. You can listen to the track below; if you dig it, All of a Sudden I Miss Everyone will not disappoint.


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