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How Will Lucky Change Under New Editor Eva Chen?

How Will Lucky Change Under Its New Editor in Chief Eva Chen?

More than one Condé Nast employee expressed shock Tuesday when news broke that Eva Chen would replace Brandon Holley as editor in chief of Lucky. Less than 24 hours later, though, some say the shift shouldn't have come as a surprise.

More on Chen's new role, here.

According to sources who spoke with WWD, Holley had been losing her control of the magazine since she solicited the advice of Anna Wintour, who became Condé Nast's artistic director in March. A month later, Wintour brought Chen in as a consultant, reportedly acting as a translator of sorts for Wintour's ideas.

While the partnership initially seemed like it was working in Holley's favor, some sources say that the changes she wanted to make to the magazine were at odds with Wintour's ideas, which were to make Lucky's content more polished and aspirational. Chen is said to have been more receptive to that direction.

Also worth nothing is that the rhetoric used to announce Chen's new position emphasized words like "ecommerce," prompting some additional speculation that Lucky will become an all-digital publication in the near future. "It's an exciting time for the brand as technology empowers and inspires the Lucky girl to embrace her own personal style," Chen said in a statement Tuesday. And despite reducing the publication from 12 issues a year to 10, in the past, Condé Nast executives have dismissed getting rid of Lucky's print product entirely.

While Holley has made no comment on her departure (her Twitter bio still says she's the magazine's editor in chief), a source told POPSUGAR Fashion that she'll take some time off before her next move.

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