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Naomi Campbell's New Reality Show

Naomi Campbell's Reality Show, Kate Moss's Charitable Portrait, and Linda Evangelista's Child Support


Those stories and more in our daily news roundup.

  • Naomi Campbell is set to star in her very own reality modeling show called The Face. The show, which will air on Oxygen starting next year, will see Campbell and two other as-of-yet-undetermined supermodels supervising three teams of models who will compete until one is chosen as the face of a brand in the United States. "With The Face the audience will get a real insider's look at this exciting industry that has been so good to me," Campbell said. [The Huffington Post]

  • Kate Moss is donating a portrait of herself taken by Solve Sundsbo to a May 17 auction sponsoring Britain's National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children. The portrait features Moss wearing nothing but a pair of gold pants and crossing her arms to cover her breasts. Its starting price is £3,000, or $4,866 at current exchange. [Vogue UK]

  • Linda Evangelista will find out this week whether a judge will grant her the $46,000 a month in child support she requested from PPR CEO François-Henri Pinault to help raise their 5-year-old son, Augustin. Evangelista revealed that Pinault was Augustin's father when she filed for child support in late 2011. Pinault is married to actress Salma Hayek; the two have a 4-year-old daughter named Valentina. [The Cut]

  • Alice Temperley is working with British high street label John Lewis on a capsule collection that will debut in September. Called Somerset by Alice Temperley, the line will range from $50 scarves to a $1,600 sheepskin coat. Day dresses will hit the $160 mark. "I wanted it to be very much a collection of essentials and to design a collection that would provide a feminine and functional wardrobe for women in their everyday life," Temperley said. [The Daily Telegraph]

  • There's been no formal explanation of why The Gap fired its creative director Patrick Robinson, but former members of the retailer's executive team say "his designs seemed lost on Gap customers." He also didn't want customers to see clothes styled any other way than how he showed them originally. "Merchants were literally told, 'You don’t get to change the product as it's presented,'" one former merchant recalled. [Fashionista]
    Source: Getty
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