Skip Nav

Raging Tempers at the Helm of Prada: Patrizio Bertelli and Miuccia Prada Clash on Red Carpet Dressing, Twitter


>> Don't be surprised
if you see more Prada on the red carpet soon. In the cover story of the March 2010 issue of WSJ., Miuccia Prada reveals that her husband Patrizio Bertelli, who also happens to be the chief executive of Prada, has been pushing her to pay more attention to marketing through celebrities. “He says that we are snobs and that we don’t understand pop culture,” Prada says of herself and her design team. "He and I have a little rule of three. If he says something more than three times, then I need to think about it. Sometimes I don’t want to listen, but I do.”

Bertelli is not known to be someone to contradict, but Prada doesn't shy away: the two are notorious for their arguments. “We work hard. It’s always an intense relationship, and it’s exhausting having to work with him. But I admire and respect him,” Prada told WSJ. “It’s a war in here every minute, and to be part of this company, you have to be trained.”

Prada sounds off on Twitter »

Bertelli famously smashed a mirror at a new Miu Miu store in Manhattan in 1997. “It made people look too fat,” he recalls. He also broke the taillights of several cars parked in the wrong spaces of Prada’s parking lot. “I enjoyed that,” he laughs.

Of her husband's temper, Prada notes: “I always tell Bertelli: You like this reputation, or you’d change it.” Bertelli, for his part, says that his temper is often used as an excuse by people who leave Prada because they can't take the fast-pace environment. “It’s true that I get angry with things that are banal. But saying that I’m irascible is also an alibi for people who don’t cut it. My behavior is always correct, and I always try to motivate people.”

Bertelli has tried to convince Prada to engage more online lately, and recently called her out in front of guests at an intimate dinner party they were hosting in their home. “Let me ask you this: Is it more democratic not to answer people’s questions on the Internet at all? Or is it more democratic to give an answer even if it’s not complete.”

Prada retorts: “Well, what if we found out years from now that Twitter is crap. Maybe years from now, we’ll all have been mistaken. It’s not that I don’t want to embrace the Internet, but I don’t want to just throw random answers out there. In that case, I’d rather not answer . . . I’d like to see you get up in the morning and sit there and answer questions online. Why don’t you do it?”

“You don’t get it, do you?” Bertelli fired back. “Communications move fast and fast communication compromises quality. It’s inevitable, and you have to accept that.” Prada flared: “Don’t treat me like an imbecile!” “I’m not. Are you finished screaming?” Bertelli roared. “And I’m supposed to be the irascible one?”

Latest Fashion