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Book Review of Ten Years Thinner

Weekend Reading: Ten Years Thinner

If you search hard enough, you can find a diet/exercise book that tells you what you want to hear. I have found this to be true for both gardening and child rearing, and now I know it to be true in the quest for a healthier, fitter, thinner body.

The contrast between Ten Years Thinner ($26) and The Thrive Diet is a case in point. Ten Years Thinner, written by Christine Lydon, M.D., argues that lean animal protein and strength training are the key components to looking and feeling your best. On the other hand, The Thrive Diet asserts that vegan, and even raw food, along with endurance training is where you will find your wealth of health. I have only read these books, and haven't followed either plan, but the contrast is fascinating to me. Both books lay out their plans convincingly, and discuss how their diets combat the negative impact of inflammation while increasing your energy levels. It just boils down to finding a plan you think you can follow for the long haul.

Want to hear the details about Ten Years Thinner? Then

.

The diet plan in Ten Years Thinner starts with eliminating certain foods and gradually adding them back into your diet over the course of six weeks. The first two weeks you avoid legumes, soy based food, dairy, grains and high glycemic index foods like potatoes, fruit juice and alcohol. Each subsequent week you reintroduce these forbidden foods, so in the end no food groups are completely off limits. Although you are encouraged to eat as little grains as possible as well as alcohol.

Workout wise the focus is strength training in daily 20 minute sessions, for four consecutive days followed by a rest day. The workouts are designed to get your heart rate up and create a post workout metabolism calorie burn too. The cool thing is that the exercise plan requires no gym time; you can do the workouts in the comfort of your own home with hand weights, a mat, a step stool and a pillow. The book includes a handful of recipes and workouts to follow. The tone of the book is, of course, up beat and friendly even though Lydon does mention that she went to Yale for medical school a few too many times in the introduction. The information is detailed and easy to follow. If you do decide to follow this plan you can find online support here in the form of active forums.

If you are curious and want to check out the book for yourself it is available at Amazon for $17.16, $8 off the cover price.

Source

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Spectra Spectra 7 years
So there's no cardio part to the workouts? That's sort of interesting. I've always had the best luck with doing cardio about 6 days a week and strength training 3 days a week and eating a mostly vegetarian diet. I'd be interested in looking at this book, but I don't think I'd follow her plan.
GlowingMoon GlowingMoon 7 years
The way I eat sounds similar to what Dr. Lydon's says, except I may eat more whole grains than she may recommend. I have some sort of whole grain at every meal. I need it. My body needs it.Also, I exercise every other day, so my body gets to recover in between work-outs. I don't exercise every day. I get too fatigued.
GlowingMoon GlowingMoon 7 years
The way I eat sounds similar to what Dr. Lydon's says, except I may eat more whole grains than she may recommend. I have some sort of whole grain at every meal. I need it. My body needs it. Also, I exercise every other day, so my body gets to recover in between work-outs. I don't exercise every day. I get too fatigued.
DreaAST DreaAST 7 years
I need to check this out!
DreaAST DreaAST 7 years
I need to check this out!
elle86 elle86 7 years
I'm skeptical... but curious. I find that the best policy is just to be as healthy as possible, and work out 5 days a week.
JudyRie JudyRie 7 years
Since I'm mostly vegetarian, I think I'd starve on that diet plan! I eat LOTS of legumes, dairy, and whole grains (and weigh 120 pounds so I don't think it's hurting me much). I've heard convincing arguments for a vegan diet, and for high-meat diets, but until it is affordable to buy only natural, grass-fed, free-range, as-humanely-as-possible raised meat, I'm going to pass as much as I can.
JudyRie JudyRie 7 years
Since I'm mostly vegetarian, I think I'd starve on that diet plan! I eat LOTS of legumes, dairy, and whole grains (and weigh 120 pounds so I don't think it's hurting me much).I've heard convincing arguments for a vegan diet, and for high-meat diets, but until it is affordable to buy only natural, grass-fed, free-range, as-humanely-as-possible raised meat, I'm going to pass as much as I can.
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