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Celeb Trainer David Kirsch Says Use Stability Ball at Work

Get Kirsched in the Office

The following post was written by New York-based trainer David Kirsch.

Has your job become a "desk sentence?" With deadlines, big projects, and upcoming presentations, fitting in exercise can be challenging — especially when you are trapped within a small cubicle from 9-5. But that's no excuse! All you working moms, busy executives, and career-focused professionals: if you have a commitment to wellness, you can make time for daily exercise even at work!

One of my clients recently read a New York Times article about using a stability ball as a chair and was curious of my take on it . . .

Using a stability ball as a chair is a great way to engage your core muscles all day long. It's also a constant reminder to exercise. Here are some other moves you can do when you are having some downtime in the office . . .

  1. Take a break from typing and do an upper body workout. Alternate between 10 push-ups and 10 dips on the stability ball. You'll feel the burn.
  2. It's crunch-time! Literally. Take 5 minutes to work your abs/core and love handles if you've got them.
  3. Tired of sitting? Get off your butt and do some single-leg squats! Repeat 10 to 15 times.

So trade in your chair for a stability ball!
For more complete office workouts, check out The Ultimate New York Diet.

Want more on Kirsching the Office? Check out my blog and learn how to make your desk a wellness zone.

Here are the details on the four stability ball exercises mentioned above:


Push-Ups on Stability Ball

Bend Dips on Stability Ball

Oblique and Lower Abs with Stability Ball

Single Leg Squat on Stability Ball

For more tips, be sure to check out all of David's posts here on FitSugar.

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GirlOverboard GirlOverboard 6 years
... Opinion: Balls as Office Chairs a Bad Idea http://www.ergoweb.com/news/detail.cfm?id=1091 "Sitting on the exercise balls with no trunk support and the constant trunk movement certainly does activate trunk musculature and therefore aids in maintaining muscle tone. However, since the muscles shorten during contraction, there is a huge compression placed on the intervertebral discs. Prolonged compression is contraindicated, especially during sitting since the pelvis is rotated forward which flattens the lumbar lordosis adding a further compressive penalty to the discs." I have a yoga ball at work, but I use it for only part of the day and while doing so, I make a point to roll back and forth, recline for 5 minutes at a time (activating the muscles in my core) and occasionally lift my feet and lean forward to do slow, controlled "push-ups" at my desk.
GirlOverboard GirlOverboard 6 years
Sorry that I have to break my posts up. Sugar isn't letting my posts submit normally, either because they're too long or because my original post contained two links. Sorry if it seems spammy, but I honestly think that Kirsch's advice is bad. I recommend reading the following: BBC News - Sitting straight 'bad for backs' http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/6187080.stm Cont...
GirlOverboard GirlOverboard 6 years
Cont... I recommend reading the following: BBC News - Sitting straight 'bad for backs' http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/6187080.stm Opinion: Balls as Office Chairs a Bad Idea http://www.ergoweb.com/news/detail.cfm?id=1091 "Sitting on the exercise balls with no trunk support and the constant trunk movement certainly does activate trunk musculature and therefore aids in maintaining muscle tone. However, since the muscles shorten during contraction, there is a huge compression placed on the intervertebral discs. Prolonged compression is contraindicated, especially during sitting since the pelvis is rotated forward which flattens the lumbar lordosis adding a further compressive penalty to the discs." I have a yoga ball at work, but I use it for only part of the day and while doing so, I make a point to roll back and forth, recline for 5 minutes at a time (activating the muscles in my core) and occasionally lift my feet and lean forward to do slow, controlled "push-ups" at my desk.
GirlOverboard GirlOverboard 6 years
Sitting on yoga ball all day is NOT good. Even when sitting on a ball it is possible to slouch and you are still creating pressure on your spine, which is not properly supported. Really, sitting on a yoga ball doesn't do much more for working your core than sitting on any other backless chair - as long as your feet are on the ground, you're stable and not really working any more muscle than you would by sitting in a backless chair. I used to sit on a ball all day and never noticed a damn thing in my abs, but did suffer from more back problems than I did at a slight recline in my chair.
GirlOverboard GirlOverboard 6 years
No, it's not. Even when sitting on a ball it is possible to slouch and you are still creating pressure on your spine that is not properly supported. Really, sitting on a yoga ball doesn't do much more for working your core than sitting on any other backless chair - as long as your feet are on the ground, you're stable and not really working any more muscle than you would by sitting in a backless chair. I used to sit on a ball all day and never noticed a damn thing in my abs, but did suffer from more back problems than I did at a slight recline in my chair. I recommend reading the following: BBC News - Sitting straight 'bad for backs' http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/6187080.stm Opinion: Balls as Office Chairs a Bad Idea http://www.ergoweb.com/news/detail.cfm?id=1091 "Sitting on the exercise balls with no trunk support and the constant trunk movement certainly does activate trunk musculature and therefore aids in maintaining muscle tone. However, since the muscles shorten during contraction, there is a huge compression placed on the intervertebral discs. Prolonged compression is contraindicated, especially during sitting since the pelvis is rotated forward which flattens the lumbar lordosis adding a further compressive penalty to the discs." I have a yoga ball at work, but I use it for only part of the day and while doing so, I make a point to roll back and forth, recline for 5 minutes at a time (activating the muscles in my core) and occasionally lift my feet and lean forward to do slow, controlled "push-ups" at my desk.
mydiadem mydiadem 6 years
I wonder if this is ergonomically safe. I get an ergonomic review yearly and we all have specialized chairs that cradle your lower back when sitting - its a big no no if it doesn't.
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