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Food Labels Revealed!

Recently I came across an interesting article on how to read between the lines on food labels. The most effective way to learn how to read a food label effectively is to learn what manufacturers may be doing to deceive us, the consumers. So here is a great list of deceptions from Mike Adams on NewsTarget.com:

  1. One trick is to distribute sugars among many ingredients so that sugars don't appear in the top three. For example, a manufacturer may use a combination of sucrose, high-fructose corn syrup, corn syrup solids, brown sugar, dextrose and other sugar ingredients to make sure none of them are present in large enough quantities to attain a top position on the ingredients list (remember, the ingredients are listed in order of their proportion in the food, with the most common ingredients listed first).
  2. Another trick is to pad the list with minuscule amounts of great-sounding ingredients. This trick is called "label padding" and it's commonly used by junk food manufacturers who want to jump on the health food bandwagon without actually producing healthy foods.
  3. A third trick involves hiding dangerous ingredients behind innocent-sounding names that fool consumers into thinking they're safe.
  4. Did you know that the name of the food product has nothing to do with what's in it? These names are designed to sell products, not to accurately describe the ingredients contained in the package. A perfect example is Krafts Guacamole Dip that contains hardly any avocado.
  5. There is no requirement for food ingredients lists to include the names of chemical contaminants, heavy metals, bisphenol-A, PCBs, perchlorate or other toxic substances found in the food.
  6. Food companies have also figured out how to manipulate the serving size of foods in order to make it appear that their products are devoid of harmful ingredients like trans fatty acids. The smaller the serving size, the closer they get to the 0.5 g loophole where they don't have to list trans fat at all.

Moral of the story: Read labels carefully, because what you see, may not always be what you get.

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