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Get Rid of Junk Food for Charity

Now that you've been reading FitSugar, you may be feeling a need to get those Twinkies out of the house, stat. Problem is your Mom always told you it's bad to waste -- Don't make me remind you that there are people starving in Africa...

Tomorrow, Saturday May 12th donate all your nonperishable goods to the United States Postal Service's annual Stamp Out Hunger Food Drive. All you have to do is leave a bag next to your mailbox and your mail man (or mail woman) will take it to a local food bank. It's the only nationwide food drive, it's super easy to do and it's free so there is no reason not to get involved. Plus now you have a reason to get rid of those honey roasted peanuts, especially since that now you've recently switched to raw almonds, those peanuts will never see the light of day. Clean out that pantry to help others as well as yourself.

For more information, check out StampOutHunger2007.com.

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eBennet eBennet 8 years
I don't mean to be a troublemaker (and it certainly wasn't my intention that anyone would start to call each other names!) however, I do feel compelled to respond to Fit's follow-up post. Fit, you say that you didn't mean for "junk" to be taken literally and that you meant wild mushroom soup and whole wheat crackers, but your post refers to Twinkies and honey-roasted peanuts. Given this, I don't think it is odd that readers would conclude that when you said "junk" you were referring to junk, not just simply quality food that didn't fit with a low-carb diet or something. I understand that you didn't mean to offend, but it seems like you're suggesting that we misinterpreted you when the original post seems pretty clear. It may not be what you meant to say but it is what you said. However, having said this, I don't wish to harp on this anymore than I already have. I'm sure we're all more aware now and hopefully everyone who could participate the the food collection did! :)
eBennet eBennet 8 years
I don't mean to be a troublemaker (and it certainly wasn't my intention that anyone would start to call each other names!) however, I do feel compelled to respond to Fit's follow-up post. Fit, you say that you didn't mean for "junk" to be taken literally and that you meant wild mushroom soup and whole wheat crackers, but your post refers to Twinkies and honey-roasted peanuts. Given this, I don't think it is odd that readers would conclude that when you said "junk" you were referring to junk, not just simply quality food that didn't fit with a low-carb diet or something. I understand that you didn't mean to offend, but it seems like you're suggesting that we misinterpreted you when the original post seems pretty clear. It may not be what you meant to say but it is what you said. However, having said this, I don't wish to harp on this anymore than I already have. I'm sure we're all more aware now and hopefully everyone who could participate the the food collection did! :)
Fitness Fitness 8 years
Wow. First of all, this intention of this post was NOT by any means to offend anyone so I apologize if that were the case. Had I have anticipated that the term "Junk" were going to be taken so literally, I would have never used it. I absolutely agree that we should not be only donating "junk" food in that sense. The phrase "One man's junk is another man's gold," is more what I was going for rather than "...Then let them eat cake,". For example, I had three cans of wild mushroom soup in my pantry (for whatever reason) that I would not touch with a ten foot pole, instead of throwing it out, I donated it. Or, say you're on a new diet that doesn't allow you to eat any kind of flour, but you have a box of whole wheat crackers, then donate them to a food bank before throwing them away. To each his own, but we are all in agreement that people should be doing more to help hunger. Thank you for all the comments.
Fitness Fitness 8 years
Wow. First of all, this intention of this post was NOT by any means to offend anyone so I apologize if that were the case. Had I have anticipated that the term "Junk" were going to be taken so literally, I would have never used it. I absolutely agree that we should not be only donating "junk" food in that sense. The phrase "One man's junk is another man's gold," is more what I was going for rather than "...Then let them eat cake,". For example, I had three cans of wild mushroom soup in my pantry (for whatever reason) that I would not touch with a ten foot pole, instead of throwing it out, I donated it. Or, say you're on a new diet that doesn't allow you to eat any kind of flour, but you have a box of whole wheat crackers, then donate them to a food bank before throwing them away. To each his own, but we are all in agreement that people should be doing more to help hunger. Thank you for all the comments.
chelseycat chelseycat 8 years
Colorful language aside, I agree with genius b. While the intentions of this post may have been in the right, it went terribly wrong. I think that using a food drive as a way to get rid of "junk-food" that the owner has deemed too bad for themselves, is really inhumane. If food is too unhealthy for you, then it's not right for anyone. Instead, try walking two feet away from your mailbox (actual distance may vary) and discard your unhealthy food for good. Although, this may not give you the same gleam of satisfaction that you get when you do something helpful, it is for the best.
geniusb geniusb 8 years
This post makes me ill. Never have I read a more selfish, misguided, and idiotic post. I want to reiterate (thanks to the others who commented) how terrible it is to donate unhealthy foods to food shelters. When donating, your rule of thumb should be if you wouldn't eat you shouldn't donate it to people who most of the time have no choice, but to consume unhealthy and inexpensive food products. If anything, by giving healthy and nourishing foods,t you are restoring dignity to individuals who typically can't afford to give their families foods that many enjoy on a regular basis. By donating unhealthy foods, you continue the cycle of obesity that plagues poverty stricken families and that is morally wrong. Just the other day, my friends and I struck up a conversation about how inexpensive fast food is and also what that means for people who can only afford fast food. If anything your ability to donate foods should allow you to make a better decision about what you donate. I hope that anyone who reads this post will only come away with how stupid the blogger is and not the thickheaded idea of donating junk food to poor people. Fit Sugar, I expected a bit more, but perhaps that was my first mistake.
geniusb geniusb 8 years
This post makes me ill. Never have I read a more selfish, misguided, and idiotic post. I want to reiterate (thanks to the others who commented) how terrible it is to donate unhealthy foods to food shelters. When donating, your rule of thumb should be if you wouldn't eat you shouldn't donate it to people who most of the time have no choice, but to consume unhealthy and inexpensive food products. If anything, by giving healthy and nourishing foods,t you are restoring dignity to individuals who typically can't afford to give their families foods that many enjoy on a regular basis. By donating unhealthy foods, you continue the cycle of obesity that plagues poverty stricken families and that is morally wrong. Just the other day, my friends and I struck up a conversation about how inexpensive fast food is and also what that means for people who can only afford fast food. If anything your ability to donate foods should allow you to make a better decision about what you donate. I hope that anyone who reads this post will only come away with how stupid the blogger is and not the thickheaded idea of donating junk food to poor people. Fit Sugar, I expected a bit more, but perhaps that was my first mistake.
ashleylynne ashleylynne 8 years
Please don't donate junk food to the food banks. These families are trying to do best and need nutrious food. Unhealthy food is typically the cheapest thing in grocery stores and obesity is becoming epidemic in low-income families because of it. If you don't think it's healthy for you, just throw it out. It's not healthy for anyone else.
mwmsjuly19 mwmsjuly19 8 years
I agree. It's coming across as though we should give away junk and not nutritious food. While poor people may appreciate Pringles, Pepsi and bags of old Halloween candy, I think we can try a bit harder to balance healthy foods with treats for people who need our help.
eBennet eBennet 8 years
While I think its great that you're publicizing this event and encouraging readers to donate goods, I hope that you're not encouraging people to use a food drive as a dumping ground for the food that they feel is not good enough for themselves, as the title of the post suggests. The recipients of the food from food drives and other charities need and deserve healthy, nutritious food just as much as the donors do. So please toss some almonds in as well!(I don't mean to come off as cranky, this is just a matter somewhat dear to me.)
eBennet eBennet 8 years
While I think its great that you're publicizing this event and encouraging readers to donate goods, I hope that you're not encouraging people to use a food drive as a dumping ground for the food that they feel is not good enough for themselves, as the title of the post suggests. The recipients of the food from food drives and other charities need and deserve healthy, nutritious food just as much as the donors do. So please toss some almonds in as well! (I don't mean to come off as cranky, this is just a matter somewhat dear to me.)
StefaPie StefaPie 8 years
I think the term is "Mail Carrier" in our gender-neutral world.
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