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How to Relieve Allergies in Bedroom

Achoo! How to Relieve Allergies in Your Bedroom

If you suffer from allergies to dander, dust mites, or mold, it's time to take a closer look at the place where you spend one-third of your day — your bedroom. Here are some things you can do to reduce your allergy symptoms.

Evict the Offenders
Looked under your bed lately? To prevent a colony of dust mites from becoming squatters in the apartment below where you sleep, vacuum under your bed at least once a week. And don't be lazy about it — move the bed and other furniture to suck up the disgusting fluffs hiding in all the nooks and crannies. If your bedroom isn't carpeted, be even more anal thorough and mop the floor. Aside from washing your sheets weekly, take time to wipe down the tops of your dressers, nightstands, the blinds, and windowsills. Not to make you crazy for cleaning, but the curtains and your comforter can get dusty too, so don't forget to wash them once a month. If your bathroom is connected to your bedroom, check the bathtub or shower for mold and mildew.

Keep reading to find out other ways you can relieve allergy symptoms in your bedroom.

Start Anew
If you can't remember when you last bought new pillows, it's time to go shopping! Not only can your skin and hair transfer pollen onto your pillow, but when oils from your body soak into the fabric, your pillow becomes a breeding ground for dust mites. Eww. Pick up a regular pillow, or if you prefer the softness of down but it makes you sneezy, the allergy med company Claritin makes Anti-Allergy Down Alternative Pillows. Whatever pillow you choose, protect it from dust mites and pet dander by zipping it in a pillow protector that contains a dust mite and dander barrier. While you're in shopping mode, consider purchasing an Anti-Pet Dander Comforter Cover.

A mattress can also be a breeding ground for dust mites and other household allergens, so if sneezing and sniffles really bother you at night, it might be time to splurge on a new mattress. Your best bet is probably a latex mattress, rather than the standard spring variety, since latex is hypoallergenic and mold resistant, and the material doesn't promote feeding or nesting of dust mites. However, the only way to protect your mattress completely is to encase it in a dust-mite-resistant cover. If you're not opposed to spending more dough, replace carpeting with hardwood floors since they're easier to keep clean.

Care For the Air You're Breathing
If you suffer from allergies to pollen, keep your bedroom windows closed at night. Use an air conditioner or ceiling fan if you're hot, and be sure to clean those periodically as well. Breathing dry air might aggravate your allergy symptoms, so invest in a humidifier. I'm a fan of cool mist humidifiers made by Crane since they're safe for curious pets and kiddos (the mist coming out is cold so there's no risk of burning). Plus they're easy to clean. Every morning, just dump out all the water and wipe down the surfaces inside to allow to air dry, and once a week, clean it with a white vinegar solution to prevent mold growth.

Shut Out Fido and Snowball
If you're allergic to pets, I know how hard it can be to live without a furry friend in the family. You might be able to tolerate them around the house, but make your bedroom a pet-free zone. That means you need to shut the door before heading out in the morning so your kitty doesn't sleep on your pillow all day. And before you hit the hay, shut them out as well so you're not breathing dander all night long.

Source: Flickr User liquene

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