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Nutritional Benefits of Cooking Two Grains Together

Mix It Up: Two Whole Grains Are Better Than One

I'm a whole grain junkie. Check my pantry; I have at least five on hand at all times. I get a little crazy with my grains, too, and instead of cooking quinoa all by its lonesome self, I mix in another grains, like millet. The combo takes your taste buds on a flavorful ride. And if you're not a fan of a grain's texture, say the chewiness of barley, adding in another grain can disguise the texture a little, making it more palatable. You also reap the nutritional benefits of both grains at the same time.

It's best to pair grains with similar cooking times. You might need to experiment with adding extra water or increasing the cooking, but once you perfect cooking two grains together, you'll never look back. I usually measure out half a cup of each dry grain to yield about two cups total once cooked. A half-cup serving of the mixed cooked grains contains approximately an 1/8 cup of each dry grain. Here is the nutritional info below for my favorite combinations.

Dry Grain Combo Calories Fiber Protein
1/8 cup millet, 1/8 cup long grain brown rice 180 (95 + 85) 3.6 (2.1 + 1.5) 4.3 (2.8 + 1.5)
1/8 cup quinoa, 1/8 cup pearled barley 166 (78 + 88) 5.4 (1.5 + 3.9) 5.5 (3 + 2.5)
1/8 cup sushi rice, 1/8 cup brown basmati rice 155 (75 + 80) 1.5 (.5 + 1) 4 (2 + 2)
1/8 cup teff, 1/8 cup short grain brown rice 175 (90 + 85) 3.5 (2 + 1.5) 5 (3.5 + 1.5)
1/8 cup wild rice, 1/8 cup white basmati rice 160 (75 + 85) 1.5 (1 + .5) 5 (3 + 2)
1/8 cup amaranth, 1/8 cup rolled oats 138 (90 + 48) 4.8 (3.5 + 1.3) 5.3 (3.5 + 1.8)
1/8 cup buckwheat groats, 1/8 cup oat groats 126 (71 + 55) 4.1 (2.1 + 2) 5.9 (2.4 + 3.5)




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