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Nutritional Properties of Turnips

Seasonal Eats: How Do You Cook Turnips?

When shopping for in-season vegetables, turnip isn't the first Winter vegetable to come to mind. The cold-weather crop doesn't win the popularity vote over more tastier or well-known options at the farmers market.

Turnips, however, hold a good deal of nutritional value. One serving of the root (about 1 cup) offers almost as much potassium as a banana, and also contains vitamins C and B, such as thiamine, riboflavin, niacin, and B6.

A popular preparation of turnips is as a substitute for mashed potatoes; mashed turnips have far less carbohydrates and calories. You can also slice them thinly and eat them raw in salads, or roast them with a little olive oil. And don't forget the turnip greens, which are also very nutritious. Turnip greens are extremely high in vitamin K — which is important for strong bones and healthy arteries — and antioxidants, not to mention their value as a detox aid. The greens are tasty as a sautéed side or steamed to maintain the most nutrients.

How do you enjoy turnips and turnip greens?

Source: Flickr User maureen lunn

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