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Reebok Settles Suit Over Fraudulent Claims of Toning Shoes

Reebok to Refund $25 Million Over False Claims of Toning Shoes

It's not all that surprising that Reebok settled a law suit over claims used to pimp its toning shoes. The lawsuit, brought by the Federal Trade Commission, comes on the heels of a report released last year by the American Council of Exercise, which found toning shoes to be no better than sneakers.

Makers of the EasyTone and RunTone toning shoes, Reebok has agreed to pay $25 million in refunds to consumers for false claims that its toning shoes worked muscles more than regular athletic shoes — ads included, among other stats, that the shoes work the glutes 28 percent more than walking shoes. The FTC investigation found that Reebok had no evidence to back up its data. Announcing the settlement, David Vladeck, director of the agency's Bureau of Consumer Protection, said, "Consumers expected to get a workout, not to get worked over." The company stands by its shoes and the balance ball technology used in the shoe to supposedly increases the work in your legs. If you purchased a pair of People Reebok toning shoes after Dec. 5, 2008, you apply for a refund through the FTC.

I tested more than a few brands of toning shoes over the years and didn't really feel a difference toning wise. Wearing MBTs, however, really helped keep my troublesome back pain-free while teaching Pilates eight hours a day. What about you? Do you have a pair of toning shoes in your closet or on your feet?

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wackdoodle wackdoodle 4 years
I bought a pair of Reebok Easytones in 2009 - so I applied for the refund. I didn't buy them for the "toning" I bought them because at the time I was walking no less than 7 miles a day 7 days a week and the "toning" bubbles on the soles gave me excellent cushioning and back protection for when I would step off the way to high curbs here in SF. Then while out on a 7 mile walk about 6 months after buying them one of the shoes sprung a leak and went flat. This rendered the pair completely useless. Since I bought them for the cushioning I'd consider buying another pair if the price was considerably less than the $100+ I paid for the first pair.
cubfanjill cubfanjill 4 years
have a few pairs actually, Reebok being one of them, Sketchers, an off brand from Payless andone from Wal Mart. With certain pairs I definetly feel it in my hamstrings, and walking on "air" helps my bum knee
benheld benheld 4 years
I never bought a pair. I honestly thought they're a bit ugly and weird-looking. (Besides ineffective) I can't think of a single product that lets you "not do any work" and gives your results that actually works.
Bettye-Wayne Bettye-Wayne 4 years
Yes, my mom got a pair and swore they worked wonders for her ass, so I got a cheap balance-ball style pair at Payless for $30 just to try them. Super comfy and great for back pain, but no noticeable toning. I assume Payless knockoffs aren't part of the lawsuit?
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