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Speed and Running

I'm not going to lie to you and tell you I am super fast; speed is not really my thing when it comes to running, although I am constantly trying to improve my time.

I was wondering if there is a caloric pay off to pushing my little envelope when it comes to speed. Are you curious too? Take this quiz to find out if you should increase your speed.

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Speed and Running

How many calories does a 130-pound woman burn by jogging for 30 minutes at a pace of 11 minutes per mile?

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ht1979 ht1979 8 years
The key here is more related to the distance than the pace. If you're running a 10 min mile for 30 minutes, you're running 3 miles. If you're running a 6 minute mile for 30 minutes, you're running 5 miles. As far as whether the calories are coming from Fat or Glycogen stores, it depends on your heart rate and your fitness level. The more elite the runner, the lower his/her heart rate at any given speed. The higher your heart rate is, the closer you get to the anaerobic workout zone where your body can't keep up with the calorie demands by burning fat, so it starts using glycogen stores from your muscles. Burning glycogen stores isn't as bad as some people think - your body has to expend calories later on to replenish them, so it's probably best to just think about it like burning calories. To get faster or to improve your endurance, adding speed to your workouts is key. By running faster than is comfortable for you on your shorter jogs, you'll be able to run incrementally faster on your longer runs (as your heart rate will start normalizing and you'll eventrually get to the point where your current 10 min/mile HR becomes your 9 min/mile HR). Hence, you'll run a bit farther in the same amount of time and get that incremental caloric burn from the additional distance.
ht1979 ht1979 8 years
The key here is more related to the distance than the pace. If you're running a 10 min mile for 30 minutes, you're running 3 miles. If you're running a 6 minute mile for 30 minutes, you're running 5 miles. As far as whether the calories are coming from Fat or Glycogen stores, it depends on your heart rate and your fitness level. The more elite the runner, the lower his/her heart rate at any given speed. The higher your heart rate is, the closer you get to the anaerobic workout zone where your body can't keep up with the calorie demands by burning fat, so it starts using glycogen stores from your muscles. Burning glycogen stores isn't as bad as some people think - your body has to expend calories later on to replenish them, so it's probably best to just think about it like burning calories.To get faster or to improve your endurance, adding speed to your workouts is key. By running faster than is comfortable for you on your shorter jogs, you'll be able to run incrementally faster on your longer runs (as your heart rate will start normalizing and you'll eventrually get to the point where your current 10 min/mile HR becomes your 9 min/mile HR). Hence, you'll run a bit farther in the same amount of time and get that incremental caloric burn from the additional distance.
AMP AMP 8 years
I was able to figure out most of these b/c of my own times and calories burned while on the treadmill. I think I really need to start kicking it up to a faster pace. Thanks for the motivation.
mwjank mwjank 8 years
There is a super article that I read last year in Runner's World about calorie burn in walking vs. running (the same distance) as well as how we should be more concerned with Net Calorie Burn (calories burned during the activity - the calories we would have burned during that time anyway just sitting around). It is fascinating. Ah - here it is http://www.runnersworld.com/article/0,7120,s6-242-304-311-8402-0,00.html
SassyK SassyK 8 years
This test owned me.
SassyK SassyK 8 years
This test owned me.
ElissaM ElissaM 8 years
So if you're running faster you are running more distance in the same amount of time...it makes since that you would then burn more calories...I only care about speed too...I'm not counting calories
ElissaM ElissaM 8 years
So if you're running faster you are running more distance in the same amount of time...it makes since that you would then burn more calories... I only care about speed too...I'm not counting calories
Buffy2103 Buffy2103 8 years
Its not so much the speed that is burning more calories, but the fact that at a faster pace, you are running farther. The average person burns approx. 100 calories per mile, regardless of the speed you are running. Running for 30 min. at an 8 min. mile pace means you are running just under 4 miles. Running for the same amount of time at a 11 min mile pace will have you running about 3 miles. This accounts for the 95 calorie difference. Not the actual speed. However, changing up your pace during your workout our, or running at a faster pace several days a week does have calorie burning benefits.
Renees3 Renees3 8 years
this is god to know. I plan on trying to increase my speed next month, so hopefully a little extra calorie burn will help drop these lbs!
missyd missyd 8 years
The way I see it, when I run I try not to worry about how fast because I will not enjoy my workout and won't stick with it! I dont want to start pushing myself to the point that it's not fun anymore for a mere 95 calories. Its not worth it. I'll go a little slower and enjoy, and therefore look forward to it next time, not dread it.
tlsgirl tlsgirl 8 years
I wish I could find a running trail that pretty.
TidalWave TidalWave 8 years
haha the last thing I ever thought about was "am I going to burn more calories if I increase my tempo in this run?" i just want good race times, could care less about calories.
Lovely_1 Lovely_1 8 years
hahah 1/5 too!!!
Lovely_1 Lovely_1 8 years
hahah 1/5 too!!!
LeLeBabii5 LeLeBabii5 8 years
good thing i took that entire quiz reading the questions and translating them in my head as "11 miles per hour" "10 miles per hour" etc etc instead of 11 MINUTE MILES. ahahha... idiot
ktgrl1818 ktgrl1818 8 years
1/5 !
ktgrl1818 ktgrl1818 8 years
1/5 !
syako syako 8 years
yea - that oxygen thing doesn't really make sense to me. How do elite runners (who run 5 minute miles) still have muscles on their body if that were true? As you start running faster more often your body gets used to it and also learns how to have a better lactate threshold - body becomes better at buffering the lactic acid (which is the muscular waste product that causes discomfort and fatigue)
syako syako 8 years
yea - that oxygen thing doesn't really make sense to me. How do elite runners (who run 5 minute miles) still have muscles on their body if that were true? As you start running faster more often your body gets used to it and also learns how to have a better lactate threshold - body becomes better at buffering the lactic acid (which is the muscular waste product that causes discomfort and fatigue)
aimeeb aimeeb 8 years
I bombed.
aimeeb aimeeb 8 years
I bombed.
chellybean chellybean 8 years
wherever that chick is running is so beautiful! just saying...
bluehippy bluehippy 8 years
40% not to bad i guess! I heard the same about the oxygen thing but i guess you just need how to breathe a certain way to get the oxygen to the muscles!
sophia_HL sophia_HL 8 years
ok, so running faster burns more calories. But I've heard that running fast cuts down your ability to breath and therefore your body does not get the oxygen it needs to burn body fat. Instead you are using energy stored in your muscles.
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