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What's the Deal with The 100-Mile Diet?

What's the Deal with The 100-Mile Diet?

Another day, another diet. Or so it seems, but I actually like the idea of this new so-called diet.

The 100-Mile Diet is a meal plan that encourages you to eat only foods grown, raised or crafted within a 100-mile radius of your home. In a nut shell, even though it is called a diet, the goal is not losing weight, but I can imagine you'll end up eating way healthier because most of us will be missing a lot of highly processed foods (unless the Lay's Potato Chip factory is in your neighborhood). The mission of the diet: Local eating equals global change for a lifestyle that promotes sustainable agriculture where you live, while cutting down on the amount of energy and resources it takes to get food to the table.

I gotta say, this diet is great in theory, but it can get pretty tough and expensive. For example if you live in the Ocean State, I am pretty sure that Rhode Island's cattle market is not so booming, but boy you'll be loving life if you're into lobsters. Or what about the abundance of veggies (or lack of) during the winter in North Dakota? I know it may sound a little crazy but think about it...before highways, airports and the internet, it was a normal way of life. (Though the inequality of women was normal too and I'm not sure I want to go back there, but ah, I digress.)

Interested? Check out the 100 mile diet site to learn more and find what 100 miles means for you.

Fit's Tip: Things to think about -- Vermont maple syrup, Maine lobsters, Iowa corn, Idaho potatoes, California raisins, Wisconsin cheese...Try doing one meal first, then consider the diet.

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LDelman LDelman 8 years
It's not a "fad diet" but rather a way to be socially, economically, and environmentally conscious of what you consume and where it comes from.
zindia zindia 9 years
This type of diet is huge on Vermont...there's always meetings for "localvores" at the food co-ops.
esk4 esk4 9 years
yeah Moni, we rhodys do have some of the oldest dairy farms around, and there is a state program helping some of the local farms get bigger within the state!
hollygo4405 hollygo4405 9 years
This seems like it would be a good diet in the summer with Farmer's Markets and fun stuff like that. But in the winter? In Minnesota? Give me Super Target anyday.
Fitness Fitness 9 years
Good to know that there are at least some cows in RI.
Moni-B Moni-B 9 years
Although we do have cattle farms in RI, I do believe that they are only for dairy. But hey, a diet rich in fish (especially lobsters) isn't too bad of an idea. :-) But the price tag is pretty huge. The university I attend tries to do sustainable meals. Most of our fruits and veggies come from local farms. ~M~
ccsugar ccsugar 9 years
I guess I'd have to eat a lot of pecans and peanuts... no thanks!
DesignRchic DesignRchic 9 years
What will they think of next? These fad diets are really funny.
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