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Whole Grains Better For a Smaller Belly

I am a fan of whole grains; they are grains as nature intended full of fiber, bran, and germ. New research indicated that they might help you decrease belly fat.

In a study where dieters were divided into two groups — one ate refined grains and the other ate only whole grains — both groups lost an equal amount of weight. However, the whole-grain group lost more belly fat. Not only that, but certain markers for metabolic syndrome, a precursor to type 2 diabetes, were also lower in the whole-grain group.

Researchers believe the high-fiber content of the whole-grain foods helped keep dieters blood-sugar levels at an even level throughout the day. Plus, whole grains are more nutrient rich and provide healthful antioxidants.

Remember to look for the whole-grain stamp on processed foods, and try whipping up a batch of quinoa for dinner. It is important to keep your waist circumference below 35 inches for women and 40 inches for men, to reduce your risk of heart disease. In fact, new data shows that strokes are on the rise in women and "spare tires" at the waistline might be to blame. So eat those whole grains!

Image Source: Getty
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Catalitical Catalitical 7 years
Actually, if a product says it is made with or without something, the product *MUST* contain or not contain that thing. This is especially important with ingredients that are known allergens (such as dairy or tree nuts). For whole grains, unless the product contains all three components of a grain (bran, germ, endosperm), it cannot by law be called whole grain. The part where this gets tricky is, HOW MUCH whole grain is in there? A cracker can say it's made with whole grains, even if it's mostly made of refined flour. The first thing to look for is the Whole Grain Stamp, but what do you do if there's no Stamp? It's important to look at the ingredients and see what order they're listed to see if you're getting a significant amount of whole grains. The closer to the beginning of the ingredient list, the more of it there is in a product. If the whole grain ingredient is first, third, or even fifth, you'll probably be getting a nutritionally significant amount. If the Stamp is present, you know you're getting AT LEAST a half-serving of whole grains, usually more. If it's the 100% Stamp, you're getting at least a full serving. Check out www.wholegrainscouncil.org for more info!
Catalitical Catalitical 7 years
Actually, if a product says it is made with or without something, the product *MUST* contain or not contain that thing. This is especially important with ingredients that are known allergens (such as dairy or tree nuts). For whole grains, unless the product contains all three components of a grain (bran, germ, endosperm), it cannot by law be called whole grain.The part where this gets tricky is, HOW MUCH whole grain is in there? A cracker can say it's made with whole grains, even if it's mostly made of refined flour. The first thing to look for is the Whole Grain Stamp, but what do you do if there's no Stamp? It's important to look at the ingredients and see what order they're listed to see if you're getting a significant amount of whole grains. The closer to the beginning of the ingredient list, the more of it there is in a product. If the whole grain ingredient is first, third, or even fifth, you'll probably be getting a nutritionally significant amount. If the Stamp is present, you know you're getting AT LEAST a half-serving of whole grains, usually more. If it's the 100% Stamp, you're getting at least a full serving. Check out www.wholegrainscouncil.org for more info!
aimeeb aimeeb 7 years
It's all I buy...
aimeeb aimeeb 7 years
It's all I buy...
leeluvfashion leeluvfashion 7 years
Even though the label may say "whole grains" doesn't mean you are actually getting the WHOLE grain (they remove the healthy shell leaving you with the leftover.) Always read the ingredients to make sure it isn't bleached or enriched; those are majors don'ts. You want, whole grains that are unenriched, unbleached.
emalove emalove 7 years
I'm all about the whole grains too...for me, it's pretty much the only bread I ever buy.
Spectra Spectra 7 years
I'm all about the whole grains! LOVE EM! They're so much healthier in just about every way than refined grains. They have more fiber, more nutrients, and they fill you up more. It's not really surprising that they reduce belly fat too...it's probably the fiber in them that helps unbloat you.
GlowingMoon GlowingMoon 7 years
I eat only whole grains, too. I thought the waist circumference needs to be below 32-1/2" to be ideal, not 35." Also, the measurement is done across the belly button, not the smallest part of the torso. Across the belly button is where the hips begin to widen. Just saying.
DreaAST DreaAST 7 years
i like whole grain bread. i like any bread actually!
missyd missyd 7 years
it's because they make you go #2
Kate-Marie Kate-Marie 7 years
I always try to make sure I have enough servings of whole grains each day. I had oatmeal for breakfast this morning and Kashi crackers with my lunch! I'm lucky that my family has always eaten pretty healthy and I've sort of grown up having whole grains (like wheat bread as opposed to white, or Cheerios instead of Frosted Flakes). Besides, I think whole grains just taste better than refined.
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