Skip Nav
Spring
Feast Your Eyes on 40 Gorgeous Food Ideas For Spring Weddings
Valentine's Day
I Tried Ordering Starbucks's Secret Valentine's Day Menu, and This Is What Happened
Food News
What Are Pulses? The Food EVERYONE Will Talk About in 2016

Europe to Ban Certain American Wines

Last week, in a frustrating turn of events, the European Union passed a law that bans the sale of any American wine with one of the following words on the labels:

Chateau, classic, clos, cream, crusted/crusting, fine, late bottled vintage, noble, ruby, superior, sur lie, tawny, vintage, vintage character

The legislation comes as a follow-up to a 2006 agreement that limited the American use of terms like "Champagne" or "Chablis." Because it preserved certain wine growing regions, this pact was widely accepted. However, the new stricter ban is not related to protecting a specific region. The law will affect American growers of port and sherry, and many large American wineries, like Washington's popular Chateau Ste. Michelle and Napa's famed Chateau Montelena, will no longer be able to sell wine in Europe.

Like many wine enthusiasts, I think this is an absurd regulation and hope that the Europeans will reconsider the terminology ban. How do you feel about it? Are you surprised to hear that Europe is prohibiting the sale of American wine?

Source

Around The Web
Pro Tip: Pair Your Girl Scout Cookies With Wine
Netflix and Chill Wine Pairings That Are Hilariously Perfect
Wine Gifting Infographic
Mulled Wine Recipe

POPSUGAR, the #1 independent media and technology company for women. Where more than 75 million women go for original, inspirational content that feeds their passions and interests.

Join The Conversation
kida7 kida7 6 years
hum.....I'm from Europe...and I have never heard of this law...I'll check it out... :D
Mädchen Mädchen 6 years
Excuse me, if I'm wrong, but doesn't this simply mean they'd have to use special labels for the wine they want to export to Europe? I honestly don't think that's THAT big of a problem. Nowhere does it say that the EU actually wants to ban those wines.
Witchy-Ways Witchy-Ways 6 years
My family runs a vinyard and this story absolutely doesn't sound ridiculous at all. All these words have a specific meaning and come from the traditions of wine making. It's always something in relation to the region or the grapes or the culture and identity of the way they are and where the wines are made. This is european wine identity and it hurts our business when when you try and steal it. The way we look at it, it can't be copied and shouldn't be. We have our own wine culture, thank you...
marie-lee marie-lee 6 years
Is it just American wines that won't be able to use that terminology within the European Union or all wines from other countries bought into Europe. As strange as the argument is it seems even weirder to me that they would have this just for American wines...
aimeeb aimeeb 6 years
:oy:
tlsgirl tlsgirl 6 years
This is so freakin' snotty.
Swedeybebe Swedeybebe 6 years
oh and all the more wine for us to drink here in the US :)
Swedeybebe Swedeybebe 6 years
sounds a bit snobbish to me.
flyingroo flyingroo 6 years
Are you kidding me?! I understand "Chateau" or "Sur Lie" but "superior"...what the heck? Are they impying that only European wines are "superior"...well, I can show them a few Australian and American wines that kick bottom!
kia kia 6 years
You mean you won't be able to find Chateau Montelena in France anymore?!? Weak!
darc5204 darc5204 6 years
My intent was to make the same comment at CMD about Roquefort -- this is another move in a game of import politics. However, petty bans by policians can economically destroy entire regions. Everyone should note that U.S. is no innocent but a leading champion at using bans and sanctions.
Mojo-Jojo Mojo-Jojo 6 years
what are they trying to say? There are no true Chateau's in America? Nothing in America could be considered "fine" or "superior" or "vintage"? How snobby is that?
doogirl doogirl 6 years
It seems a little high school to me. And I feel really bad for the US winemakers who will no longer be able to sell in Europe. I know I will no longer purchase any wine from Europe, I'll just stick to the US from now on!
DeviousMuse DeviousMuse 6 years
Seriously? This is just petty playground stuff.
ilanac13 ilanac13 6 years
i kind of feel like it's almost too petty - but i guess if they are trying to make a point then they will. i know that there are a few certified champagne producers here in the states - but in general, most folks know not to use the name. as for vintage and things like that - those words are too common/generic that it'll really infringe on a lot of varities
Smacks83 Smacks83 6 years
CMD, I was thinking the same thing. It's becoming a playground war game. If I can't have this, then you can't have that! Childish much? And I mean that one both sides of this issue.
cmd0610 cmd0610 6 years
well we are preventing Roquefort from being sold here so who can blame them for wanting a little revenge ;)?
janetwrogers janetwrogers 6 years
I'm not surprised at all. The way the European Union polices language use on products is right out of Monty Python.
Latest Food
X