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Soup's On: Cream of Fresh Tomato

Soup's On: Cream of Fresh Tomato

While shopping at Berkeley Bowl, I came across the bargain section of fresh produce. Most of the time I won't glance at this section, but a two-pound bag of ripe red tomatoes caught my eye. At only $0.99 per bag, I couldn't pass them up since I had a hankering for a bowl of fresh tomato soup.

The recipe calls for seeded and peeled tomatoes; however, I didn't want to waste time or lose a bunch of juice — especially because the tomatoes were really meaty. Also, once the soup makes its way through the blender, the seeds and skin are virtually undetectable.

Rather than use the conventional basil and thyme, I opted for lime basil and lemon thyme in the soup. Each spoonful of this comforting classic is fresh and flavorful. If you have some end-of-season tomatoes on hand, get started on this soup. You won't be disappointed! Get the recipe after the jump.

Cream of Tomato Soup

Cream of Tomato Soup

Cream of Tomato Soup

Ingredients

2 tablespoons butter
1 medium onion, chopped
2 shallots, chopped
2 small carrots, peeled and finely diced
2 tablespoons flour
2 pound fresh tomatoes, chopped, or 1 (28-ounce) can crushed tomatoes, juices reserved
2 cups reduced-sodium canned chicken broth or make your own
1 tablespoon tomato paste
1 tablespoon fresh lime basil or 1/2 teaspoon dried basil
2 teaspoons fresh lemon thyme or 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme leaves
1 bay leaf
1/2 cup heavy whipping cream
Salt and pepper

Directions

  1. In a large nonreactive saucepan, melt butter over medium heat. Add onion and carrot and cook, stirring frequently, until softened, 3 to 5 minutes.
  2. Add flour and cook, stirring constantly, 1 to 2 minutes without allowing to color.
  3. Add tomatoes with their juices, broth, tomato paste, basil, thyme and bay leaf. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat to low, cover, and simmer stirring frequently, 15 minutes. Remove and discard bay leaf.
  4. In a food processor or blender with caution, puree soup in very small batches until smooth. Return to pan and stir in cream. Season with salt and pepper, to taste. Simmer until heated through, 3 to 5 minutes, and serve.

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lovesickblues111 lovesickblues111 6 years
Just what I need right now...:):):)
Chaoticfury Chaoticfury 6 years
Oh this is perfect!!! It will be raining all weekend and I am going to make this tomorrow!! Thank you Yum!
fuzzles fuzzles 6 years
Ha! Didn't see your response, YumSugar! Blonde moment!
fuzzles fuzzles 6 years
Auntie May, A nonreactive saucepan is composed of materials that will not impart a metallic taste to highly acidic foods--like tomatoes. Copper and aluminum are no-nos for making a soup like this. Instead, stainless steel, enameled cast iron, ceramic and glass cookware are the best choices for acidic dishes. That recipe sounds great! :feedme: I love the switch on the traditional seasonings!
Food Food 6 years
Auntie May May-nonreactive include the following: clay, enamel, glass, plastic, or stainless steel. You just don't want to use aluminum or copper which might leave the soup tasting metallic. I used a stainless steel pot and the soup tasted delicious!
ruby-soho ruby-soho 6 years
Auntie May May- I think a nonreactive saucepan would be made of ceramic (like a le creuset)instead of metal.
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