Skip Nav
Spring
Feast Your Eyes on 40 Gorgeous Food Ideas For Spring Weddings
Valentine's Day
I Tried Ordering Starbucks's Secret Valentine's Day Menu, and This Is What Happened
Food News
What Are Pulses? The Food EVERYONE Will Talk About in 2016

Thanksgiving Tip: Make an Oven Plan

If you are hosting Thanksgiving tomorrow, it's most likely your oven is going to see a lot of action. To ensure that everything gets cooked, I suggest making an oven plan to keep you organized. Here's how:

  1. Start by listing every dish that needs oven time. Write the name of the dish, the temperature it cooks at, and how long it takes to bake/roast.
  2. Take note of which dishes can be made in advance and which can be cooked at the same time.
  3. Make an oven time frame. For example, bake the pie in the morning, the turkey in the afternoon, and while the turkey rests, cook any other side (sweet potatoes, cornbread, stuffing, etc.).

Cooking a bunch of dishes on the stove? Adapt this plan to include stovetop space. How have you gotten organized for Thanksgiving dinner?

Around The Web
Vegan Gluten-Free Pumpkin Cookies
7-Day Gratitude Challenge
What to Do After Overeating
How to Make Butterscotch
Romantic Gifts For Boyfriends
Gratitude Cards and Gifts
Unique Cookie Recipes

POPSUGAR, the #1 independent media and technology company for women. Where more than 75 million women go for original, inspirational content that feeds their passions and interests.

Join The Conversation
chiefdishwasher chiefdishwasher 7 years
That's a "Plan". Great idea!
valancyjane valancyjane 7 years
I have never been able to figure out how to juggle multiple dishes that are supposed to bake at different temperatures. In the plan above you could stagger things, but it doesn't always work out that way. I've tried to fudge things a little - 30 minutes at 450 = 40 minutes at 400 or something like that - but sometimes it just doesn't work! And then if you have multiple pans in the oven sometimes you need to bake for a longer time anyway ... there's so much cooking math and it makes my head hurt. Thankfully I am not cooking this year, just bringing a few dishes, but one year it will be my turn and then ... eek!
flyingroo flyingroo 7 years
Syako, in case you need to bake them at your home, I would suggest buying one of those thermal lined bags, maybe one for each. This way you can finish baking them right when you're ready to leave and they won't get cold by the time you travel to your host's house. I found such bags at Albertsons, they are about $3 each, but I bet you can buy them from other places as well.
syako syako 7 years
Thanks Party! I'll give her a call this afternoon. :)
partysugar partysugar 7 years
syako: I would call up the hostess and see how much oven space she has. If there is room to cook your casseroles there then do so. However, if there is not, yes cook and reheat at the dinner. Be sure to let the hostess know how much time they will need in the oven for re-heating and at what temperature, so she can plan accordingly.
tlsgirl tlsgirl 7 years
This is such a good idea. Heck, I feel like I should do this for my normal weekday dinners. I'm terrible at timing.
ilanac13 ilanac13 7 years
i think that this is one of the best recommendations that you can make to someone that's cooking their first thanksgiving or even for someone who's more experienced. i think that we all forget that sometimes things need to cook at higher temps or for longer, so being organized like this is really smart. i'm just a diner, not a cook this year, so i'm not really going to be all the involved, but i think that it's something to store in the back of my mind for the time that i do cook.
syako syako 7 years
I have a question for anyone who wants to answer it: I'm traveling about 20 miles to have thanksgiving dinner with some family. I'm bringing two casserole dishes. What's the best way to travel with this? Should I put them in the oven at home for the full time, cover and then reheat once I get to the host's house? Thanks!
shoneyjoe shoneyjoe 7 years
Yup. Ran into this problem last night. Two ovens. Two turkeys. Three platters of rolls, two pans of stuffing, and a green bean casserole. Whoops. Two platters of rolls ended up being the lids for the pans of stuffing, the rolls were a little late, and the opening and closing of the oven door made the last 20 minutes of turkey cooking wonky. That said, 70% of the food on the table was gone by the time I got to carving the second turkey!
Latest Food
X