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What Are Fraises du Bois?

Definition: Fraises du Bois

If you're tempted by strawberries, you'll love fraises du bois (pronounced "frehz di-bwa"). French for "strawberries from the woods," these small, delicate berries come from forests, where they grow naturally. The highly seasonal berries are intensely flavorful, making them pricey and coveted. Fraises du bois are similar to but should not be confused with alpine strawberries, which grow on mountaintops. Have you ever tried them?

Source: Flickr User morberg

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Food Food 6 years
Then I stand corrected! For those of you curious, it sounds like it should be des, not du. Thanks for the clarification, Finn!
CoconutPie CoconutPie 6 years
I'm pretty sure most people say fraises des bois / des champs. Never heard anyone say fraises du bois before. In French it doesn't sound right to use the singular with bois in this situation. The strawberries are not particular to one specific forest but to many. I could be wrong though (but French is my first language). Or the expression could be specific to certain regions of France, Belgium or Switzerland. It's difficult to find information about the correct way to write it but here's a translation: http://dictionnaire.reverso.net/francais-anglais/fraise%20des%20bois
Food Food 6 years
It's funny, FinnLover, I thought it was fraises des bois, too, but someone who speaks French told me it should be fraises du bois. Is it both? I've seen it spelled both ways. That's my burning question for the day!
Food Food 6 years
It's funny, FinnLover, I thought it was fraises des bois, too, but someone who speaks French told me it should be fraises du bois. Is it both? I've seen it spelled both ways. That's my <a href="http://www.yumsugar.com/tag/burning+question">burning question</a> for the day!
CoconutPie CoconutPie 6 years
The correct grammar is ''fraises des bois'' In Québec we call them ''fraises des champs'', champs meaning fields. They're really common in Canada and grow pretty much everywhere in the countryside. I've seen them in Norway and Finland too. They're much sweeter and less acidic than the bigger strawberries. They make lovely tartelettes.
CoconutPie CoconutPie 6 years
The correct grammar is ''fraises des bois'' In Québec we call them ''fraises des champs'', champs meaning fields. They're really common in Canada and grow pretty much everywhere in the countryside. I've seen them in Norway and Finland too. They're much sweeter and less acidic than the bigger strawberries. They make lovely tartelettes.
krob krob 6 years
Can you even get these in the states? If so, where?
RoaringSilence RoaringSilence 6 years
They are currently taking over my garden :D I recommend you plant some.. so much easier than regular strawberries.
Food Food 6 years
I've never had this, but I've always wanted to try it! Obviously, if I am gaga for strawberries, I'm going to flip for these.
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