Skip Nav
Food News
The 1 Ingredient That Makes the McCafé Shamrock Drinks Different Than the Shake
Kid-Friendly Recipes
The Only Chocolate Chip Cookie Recipe You'll Need
Spring
10 Cozy Irish Soups to Make This St. Patrick's Day and Beyond

What Is Kombucha?

What Is Kombucha, Anyway?

Kombucha, once a product with a small but devoted following, has surged so much in popularity that it's largely left behind its somewhat crunchy reputation. It's no longer available at just health stores; it's now even stocked at some drugstores. But what is it exactly, and what's all the fuss?

The short answer: kombucha is a fermented, probiotic tea that's tart, lightly sweetened, and slightly effervescent.

The long answer: Whether homemade or store-bought, kombucha gets its characteristic tang and effervescence from a fermentation process somewhat similar to brewing vinegar. Tea, sweetener, a SCOBY (short for symbiotic culture of bacteria and yeast), and flavor additives like fruit juice or ginger are combined and fermented in a process that lasts about 10 days.

ADVERTISEMENT

Keep reading for the rest of the in-depth explanation.

Though made with yeast, kombucha is only mildly alcoholic — most brews are no more than 0.5 percent alcohol by volume. The yeast component of the SCOBY works in concert with bacteria, with some of the sweetener converting into alcohol (from yeast activity) and some into acetic acid (from bacterial activity), resulting in a product that's not overwhelmingly alcoholic, tart, or sweet.

Despite a relatively recent surge in popularity, kombucha is believed to have been first made around the time that tea plants were first cultivated in ancient China. It spread to other regions of Asia, Eastern Europe, and Russia, where it's called tea kvass. Some consume it for its purported health benefits, while others enjoy it purely for its fizz and mouthwatering acidity. While it's not for everyone, kombucha is available in a wide range of flavors, and many varieties are milder in flavor than they're often made out to be. Try a bottle (you may just become a kombucha convert!), and even try your hand at making it at home.

Photos: Nicole Perry; Instagram user beton93
Around The Web
Join The Conversation
How to Turn Off Live Notifications on Instagram
Easy Chocolate Chip Cookie Recipe
Cookie Dough Kit Kats Recipe
Colombia Travel Tips
How Caffeine Affects Anxiety
Single-Leg Touch Exercise For Glutes
3-Ingredient Breakfast Recipes

POPSUGAR, the #1 independent media and technology company for women. Where more than 75 million women go for original, inspirational content that feeds their passions and interests.

From Our Partners
Latest Food
All the Latest From Ryan Reynolds