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Opening Ceremony

Those stories and more in our daily news roundup.
  • Marchesa will introduce its first fragrance, the seductively named Parfume d'Extase, at Sephora in September. The rock crystal-shaped bottle comes in two sizes that will retail between $60 and $85, and a roll-on version of the scent will sell for $25. [Elle]
  • Calvin Klein's ex-boyfriend Nick Gruber says the designer has been "supportive of my sobriety" and happily reports that he is "clean on drugs and alcohol." Klein sent Gruber to a rehab facility after he was arrested for cocaine possession in April. [The Cut]
  • Kirna Zabête's highly anticipated clothing line for The Shops at Target will be in stores on Sept. 9, but photos of the offering have appeared online. [FabSugar]
  • Gia Coppola is intent on making a name for herself as a fashion-film director. "It's cool because it’s a new way to show clothes and see how they move, plus you have a little story, so it adds personality," she says. "And it's helpful when companies are open to letting you do what you want." [WWD]
  • Lou Doillon's busy acting, modeling, and singing careers have meant that she hasn't "had a real love life," she says. "I've never had someone living with me in my house. I guess that would consume a lot of time." [WWD]
  • The recent economic downturn has pushed sales of clothing down and sales of accessories up — which has also meant an increase in the number of fashion students majoring in accessory design. [The New York Times]
  • For the first issue of Opening Ceremony's magazine OC Annual, Bruce Weber shot Gaia Repossi doing yoga in front of a bus. [Fashionista]
  • Jonathan Saunders has had a successful Olympic season: his clothing was featured in the games' opening ceremony, worn on the cover of British Vogue, and spotted on the back of Samantha Cameron, the wife of UK Prime Minister David Cameron. [Vogue UK]
  • Kate Moss, Sienna Miller, and Keira Knightley all donated shoes to be auctioned off for the Small Steps Project, which raises money to provide clothing and food for children who work in landfills. [Vogue UK]
>> Those stories and more in our daily news roundup.
  • Calvin Klein designer Francisco Costa landed his first modeling assignment with the American Foundation for AIDS Research. Costa will star in a campaign advertising the organization's new "São Paolo for the Cure!" t-shirts, set to debut tomorrow in his native Brazil. He's joined in the campaign by fellow Brazilians Luciana Casta and Raquel Zimmermann. [Daily Front Row]
  • Natalia Vodianova took flak for saying "It's better to be skinny than to be fat" at this past weekend's Vogue festival, and today she responded to the criticism on her Facebook page, explaining that her original comment was designed to make people laugh. "If I was giving a speech I would have chosen my words more carefully of course," she wrote. [The Cut]
  • Opening Ceremony will open its first London store — a pop-up shop — to celebrate the start of the 2012 Olympic games this July. When the games are over, the store will move to a permanent spot on King Street in the Covent Garden neighborhood. "Bringing Opening Ceremony to Covent Garden is an important next step in the growth of our company," said founders Humberto Leon and Carol Lim. [Catwalk Queen]
  • The Food and Drug Administration will start monitoring what goes into beauty products sold in the United States by creating a mandatory ingredient registry next year. Current law allows beauty companies to report their ingredients voluntarily, and there are only 10 ingredients that are banned from domestic products. In the European Union, tighter beauty industry regulations have banned some 1,200 ingredients. [Refinery29]
  • Richemont, owner of luxury jewelers and watchmakers like Cartier and IWC, won a momentous infringement case against a company that registered the trademark for Vacheron Constantin — Richemont's oldest watch brand — in Russia and sold clothes under that label. The outcome of the case means that a well-known trademark in one country can't be taken and reregistered in another country, because it can confuse consumers and harm the original trademark holder's reputation. "This is a landmark case with worldwide implications," said Richemont chief counsel Frederick Mostert. [Material World] Photo: Natalia Vodianova walks during Stella McCartney's Fall 2012 show.