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Briefing Book! Knowing Is Half the Battle . . .

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Michelann Michelann 7 years
Raci, could you rephrase your statement? I'm not sure I understand what you're trying to say. First of all, he's not dead. Secondly, he didn't have insurance to begin with. So the insurance companies didn't really have anything to do with it. That isn't the government's fault. It's his.
sugarbean sugarbean 7 years
also worth mentioning that since it was passed in 1997, the people of Oregon have voted to uphold the "Dying with Dignity" legislation that appears to be behind Mr. Stroup's predicament. So... don't live in Oregon. If you do live in Oregon, do something to change it. And if you live in another state, keep an eye out on pending legislation or constitutional amendments that may generate a similar result
sugarbean sugarbean 7 years
also worth mentioning that since it was passed in 1997, the people of Oregon have voted to uphold the "Dying with Dignity" legislation that appears to be behind Mr. Stroup's predicament. So... don't live in Oregon. If you do live in Oregon, do something to change it. And if you live in another state, keep an eye out on pending legislation or constitutional amendments that may generate a similar result
sugarbean sugarbean 7 years
Don't think that the article on Townhall bothered to mention the following: (borrowed from Fox News believe it or not) For Stroup, however, suicide was never an option. He fought back, and the Oregon Health Plan eventually reversed its decision and is now paying for his chemotherapy, giving him hope he'll be around a little longer for his 80-year-old mother and five grandchildren. Haven't looked into how/why the state reversed it's decision, but it's worth pointing out.
sugarbean sugarbean 7 years
Don't think that the article on Townhall bothered to mention the following: (borrowed from Fox News believe it or not)For Stroup, however, suicide was never an option. He fought back, and the Oregon Health Plan eventually reversed its decision and is now paying for his chemotherapy, giving him hope he'll be around a little longer for his 80-year-old mother and five grandchildren.Haven't looked into how/why the state reversed it's decision, but it's worth pointing out.
stephley stephley 7 years
Jill, just remember that some day the republicans will have to live with a president who is a Democrat and has all the imperial powers these guys gave away.
Jillness Jillness 7 years
Oh, I hope the Bush advisor decision isn't over turned. What is the difference between executive privilege out of control and a dictatorship? Did anyone see that they just revised the roles of the intelligence community with out input from Congress???
Jillness Jillness 7 years
Oh, I hope the Bush advisor decision isn't over turned. What is the difference between executive privilege out of control and a dictatorship? Did anyone see that they just revised the roles of the intelligence community with out input from Congress???
raciccarone raciccarone 7 years
That's funny Michelin, because the insurance companies were the ones to let him die. Do you see that as a cause or is everything government's fault?
janneth janneth 7 years
That first article makes me want to SCREAM! This cannot be happening.
stephley stephley 7 years
If you can afford private insurance, or can afford to pay higher premiums for better care. One of the big flaws of our current system is that it's priced quality health care beyond what millions of working Americans can afford.
Great-Sommelier Great-Sommelier 7 years
Amen Mich.
Great-Sommelier Great-Sommelier 7 years
Amen Mich.
Michelann Michelann 7 years
Stephley, at least with a private insurance company you have a choice of which company you'd like and how much coverage you'd like. Obviously there are flaws with our current insurance system, but there's no way allowing government bureaucrats to make those decisions is going to help.
jessie jessie 7 years
about the first article, i'm on the fence with that one.
stephley stephley 7 years
I'm not sure anyone would feel it is better to have a private insurance company decide you're too expensive to treat, or that a transplant that could save your life is too costly. Which they do all the time.
Michelann Michelann 7 years
The first story is pretty messed up. This is just one of the many problems that arise when you allow government to pay for (and thus make decisions regarding) your health care.
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