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I Like You! America's New Self-Image

I Like You! America's New Self-Image

If you've meandered through Europe with a Canadian flag on your backpack, it's time to switch it up. With the US's improving image, it's suddenly cool to be American again — both at home and abroad.

First off, the US is making new friends. "Yes we can, be friends," proclaimed a German newspaper across its front page, "We have fallen in love with the new, the different, the good America."

US citizens abroad are receiving more friendly gestures and kind words for being nothing other than their American selves. This newfound goodwill isn't just improving America's international image, but also its sense of self at home. For more on unlikely patriots coming out in the bluest of places,

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Nowhere is this more evident — OK, hopefully somewhere — than at a spontaneous election-night celebration on the streets of a hipster safe haven in Brooklyn, where American flags waved without a hint of irony. If these kids 30-year-olds are willing to get handcuffed for their country, then I would say change truly has arrived.

Does it anger you to see people be proud on a part-time basis? Or is it good to see excitement where there was once apathy?

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Advah Advah 8 years
Hainan - thanks for your comment, although I still don't completley agree with you, I see what you were saying.Believe it or not, I got a lot of sh*t from learning German in high school because we were only 12 out of about 150-200 kids not learning Spanish, and most people easily made the confusion between Germany and Nazis - idiots.Anyway. I have to say I find the worldwide reactions to Obama's elections rather obnoxious. Yes I'm European and I'm glad to see he won. But saying in a paper "Now we can be friends" is pushing it. Obviously whatever happens in the US has an repercussion on the rest of the world, and it's fair enough for people to say what they think of another political leader; I still get annoyed when people think they can tell Americans what they should do (my American friends get a lot of that here), it's not like Europe is doing everything perfectly..Hainan - sorry I promise I'm not picking on you, but I still don't agree with your other comments."As long as whites in America are constantly reminded of slave holders in our past... germans should be reminded about the nazis in theirs... if you forget your history you cannot learn from it... why does that bother you so much??"The WORLD should be reminded about WW2, not Germany! The Nazis took over the government in Germany because, in an odd way, Hitler was at the right place, at the right time. Sadly, I think the same would have happened in any country with the same political and economical situation. Take the war in Iraq and Bush's re-election (I'm not comparing that to the Nazis specifically) - in 50 years, people will probably see these two things as a direct result of a specific economic situation and 9/11.Also, when you said "I just feel many citizens here get very frustrated when people call the US a bad country, when we have done more globally then ANY country ever in existence" - I can completely see why being constantly labelled a 'bad country' can be exhausting, and yes the US might have done more than other countries globally. But that's also because the US are SO much bigger than any other country, and economically much more powerful. You can't expect Spain or Italy to contribute in the same way.Re the US/Europe situation, you said"I spoke of the people in France and their weird relationship with Americans LONG before Bush came into office...." and "When I went to France in 98 well before Bush, they were (with a few exceptions) rude to me the minute they heard me speak."Sorry to hear that happened to you, unfortunately there are idiots everywhere. However I do think the French situation is a bit different: French do like to talk loud about how the US is a bad country, but they absolutely idolize a lot of American things. Cinema, fast-food, etc. - you'd be surprised by how popular these things are in France. They still have so many stereotypes about the US; it's not an excuse, but I really think their reactions are based more on these stereotypes than what actually happens politically.As for the accent thing, it's not the first time I hear that (a friend of mine had the same experience in Paris two years ago). However I'm pretty sure that wasn't meant against you as an *American*, simply because most French people can't spot the difference between an American and a British/Australian accent (they seriously are terrible at languages). They just have that same reaction to any foreign speaker.
Advah Advah 8 years
Hainan - thanks for your comment, although I still don't completley agree with you, I see what you were saying. Believe it or not, I got a lot of sh*t from learning German in high school because we were only 12 out of about 150-200 kids not learning Spanish, and most people easily made the confusion between Germany and Nazis - idiots. Anyway. I have to say I find the worldwide reactions to Obama's elections rather obnoxious. Yes I'm European and I'm glad to see he won. But saying in a paper "Now we can be friends" is pushing it. Obviously whatever happens in the US has an repercussion on the rest of the world, and it's fair enough for people to say what they think of another political leader; I still get annoyed when people think they can tell Americans what they should do (my American friends get a lot of that here), it's not like Europe is doing everything perfectly.. Hainan - sorry I promise I'm not picking on you, but I still don't agree with your other comments. "As long as whites in America are constantly reminded of slave holders in our past... germans should be reminded about the nazis in theirs... if you forget your history you cannot learn from it... why does that bother you so much??" The WORLD should be reminded about WW2, not Germany! The Nazis took over the government in Germany because, in an odd way, Hitler was at the right place, at the right time. Sadly, I think the same would have happened in any country with the same political and economical situation. Take the war in Iraq and Bush's re-election (I'm not comparing that to the Nazis specifically) - in 50 years, people will probably see these two things as a direct result of a specific economic situation and 9/11. Also, when you said "I just feel many citizens here get very frustrated when people call the US a bad country, when we have done more globally then ANY country ever in existence" - I can completely see why being constantly labelled a 'bad country' can be exhausting, and yes the US might have done more than other countries globally. But that's also because the US are SO much bigger than any other country, and economically much more powerful. You can't expect Spain or Italy to contribute in the same way. Re the US/Europe situation, you said "I spoke of the people in France and their weird relationship with Americans LONG before Bush came into office...." and "When I went to France in 98 well before Bush, they were (with a few exceptions) rude to me the minute they heard me speak." Sorry to hear that happened to you, unfortunately there are idiots everywhere. However I do think the French situation is a bit different: French do like to talk loud about how the US is a bad country, but they absolutely idolize a lot of American things. Cinema, fast-food, etc. - you'd be surprised by how popular these things are in France. They still have so many stereotypes about the US; it's not an excuse, but I really think their reactions are based more on these stereotypes than what actually happens politically. As for the accent thing, it's not the first time I hear that (a friend of mine had the same experience in Paris two years ago). However I'm pretty sure that wasn't meant against you as an *American*, simply because most French people can't spot the difference between an American and a British/Australian accent (they seriously are terrible at languages). They just have that same reaction to any foreign speaker.
StolzeMama StolzeMama 8 years
youre so quick to jumped to the correlation between hope and change, I almost think you agree with my thinking. I never said anything about Obama in that... if you think it was about Obama you are free to your thinking ... and speaking of heated comments "but we currently have a doofus" sounds a lot like pot calling the kettle black!!!! You aren't going to convince me that People in europe should not be so quick to judge. As long as whites in America are constantly reminded of slave holders in our past... germans should be reminded about the nazis in theirs... if you forget your history you cannot learn from it... why does that bother you so much?? I think you misinterpreted my comments... I think Germany is a fine country, I think that many were fooled in their past by an administration fueled by a socialist party promising equality for all germans... what they did was wrong... I still love them... iraq war A(in hindsight) was wrong.... Simply stated- I THINK EUROPEANS ARE FICKLE!!!! for people to be afraid to show an American flag in Europe is simply ridiculous given europes own history...... As is people in the us calling fries "freedom fries" ridiculous and fickle..... i think the us minority that did this does not even compare to the press and government of european nations doing this...
StolzeMama StolzeMama 8 years
youre so quick to jumped to the correlation between hope and change, I almost think you agree with my thinking. I never said anything about Obama in that... if you think it was about Obama you are free to your thinking ...and speaking of heated comments "but we currently have a doofus" sounds a lot like pot calling the kettle black!!!!You aren't going to convince me that People in europe should not be so quick to judge.As long as whites in America are constantly reminded of slave holders in our past... germans should be reminded about the nazis in theirs... if you forget your history you cannot learn from it... why does that bother you so much??I think you misinterpreted my comments... I think Germany is a fine country, I think that many were fooled in their past by an administration fueled by a socialist party promising equality for all germans... what they did was wrong... I still love them... iraq war A(in hindsight) was wrong.... Simply stated- I THINK EUROPEANS ARE FICKLE!!!! for people to be afraid to show an American flag in Europe is simply ridiculous given europes own history...... As is people in the us calling fries "freedom fries" ridiculous and fickle..... i think the us minority that did this does not even compare to the press and government of european nations doing this...
Meike Meike 8 years
Oh, it's pretty simple why I am in an uproar about some of your posts when you make heated, generalized comments like the one quoted below. [And to those countries who treated Americans like crap... shame on you. Need I remind you Germans especially.... Your country was responsible for not one but 2 of the deadliest wars of all times!!!!! And not to mention the US helping the French during both of those situations... It's like biting the hand that feeds you...a And germany received us foreign aid in 2004!!] So, whenever America receives foreign aid especially in our economic crisis, we always ought to maintain a favorable opinion of the country that feeds us? Sorry, that would be irrational. It's like telling me to appreciate the Chinese government whom we owe a lot of money to. [But all I said was you would think they could sympathize is all... The US helped out the Germans a lot with their image and helped them to rebuild their country.] Much of the Western world has sympathized with Americans. They cheered when they felt our country made internal progress, offered their condolences when we had suffered the worst terrorist attack in our history, and let us know they were let down when the Bush administration started to make poor decisions. When the U.S. helped Germans rebuild its country and image, it was after WWII was over and the defeat of a corrupt leader and regime. Western Germany was essentially leaderless and America, France, and the UK were enthusiastic to help the disarrayed people. Germany among other Western countries are also more willing to help America out as long as they can respect its leaders but we currently have a doofus and a bad administration in the White House. The change is that they do respect our President-Elect and that's why they are enthusiastic about America. So, we can expect such countries to be more cooperative. [I think Germans are a great people who were fooled by a candidate who chanted "hope" and "change".] Sorry, but chanting "hope" and "change" were not the sole reason behind 66 million American votes and 90% popular opinion among Germans for Obama. The same applies to those who say Republicans only opted for McCain because of oil and "Drill, Baby, Drill!" As far as I know, Germans are as well versed on our American politics as the lot of us who are well-informed on both candidates. There were many reasons why I would have voted for McCain but there were more reasons why I did vote for Obama.
Meike Meike 8 years
Oh, it's pretty simple why I am in an uproar about some of your posts when you make heated, generalized comments like the one quoted below.[And to those countries who treated Americans like crap... shame on you. Need I remind you Germans especially.... Your country was responsible for not one but 2 of the deadliest wars of all times!!!!! And not to mention the US helping the French during both of those situations... It's like biting the hand that feeds you...a And germany received us foreign aid in 2004!!]So, whenever America receives foreign aid especially in our economic crisis, we always ought to maintain a favorable opinion of the country that feeds us? Sorry, that would be irrational. It's like telling me to appreciate the Chinese government whom we owe a lot of money to.[But all I said was you would think they could sympathize is all... The US helped out the Germans a lot with their image and helped them to rebuild their country.]Much of the Western world has sympathized with Americans. They cheered when they felt our country made internal progress, offered their condolences when we had suffered the worst terrorist attack in our history, and let us know they were let down when the Bush administration started to make poor decisions. When the U.S. helped Germans rebuild its country and image, it was after WWII was over and the defeat of a corrupt leader and regime. Western Germany was essentially leaderless and America, France, and the UK were enthusiastic to help the disarrayed people.Germany among other Western countries are also more willing to help America out as long as they can respect its leaders but we currently have a doofus and a bad administration in the White House. The change is that they do respect our President-Elect and that's why they are enthusiastic about America. So, we can expect such countries to be more cooperative.[I think Germans are a great people who were fooled by a candidate who chanted "hope" and "change".] Sorry, but chanting "hope" and "change" were not the sole reason behind 66 million American votes and 90% popular opinion among Germans for Obama. The same applies to those who say Republicans only opted for McCain because of oil and "Drill, Baby, Drill!" As far as I know, Germans are as well versed on our American politics as the lot of us who are well-informed on both candidates. There were many reasons why I would have voted for McCain but there were more reasons why I did vote for Obama.
Witchy-Ways Witchy-Ways 8 years
Hainan, there are very few survivors of these times still alive in Germany, do you honestly want them to sympathize with US citizens based on the sins and mistakes people two or three generations ago made? Also, even though young Germany is very much aware of both WWs, where's the real comparison you want to draw from it? Where are the similarities? It was a completely hateful ideology and just to remind you, most people who weren't even Nazis were also forced to enter the Nazi party so they had very little to do with the crimes committed at that time. If you really want to compare, I would say that Germans shouldn't sympathize at all with Americans since so many people in the states actually supported the war in Iraq and other completely senseless and inhumane ideas of the Bush administration (Gitmo, for example).
StolzeMama StolzeMama 8 years
Meike, I said nothing of the German dissent for Americans. I was only trying to let Advah know that I was not trying to be hateful only trying to make a point about the assumptions people make. I think Germans are a great people who were fooled by a candidate who chanted "hope" and "change" I never felt for a second that I wasn't welcome in Germany, although the last time I went there was in 1998. I spoke of the people in France and their weird relationship with Americans LONG before Bush came into office.... it's not fair on either side, not to us and not to the Germans.... But all I said was you would think they could sympathize is all... The US helped out the Germans a lot with their image and helped them to rebuild their country. I just feel many citizens here get very frustrated when people call the US a bad country, when we have done more globally then ANY country ever in existence. I don't know why you are in such an uproar...
Meike Meike 8 years
Advah, I applaud you. And, yeah, I'm going to make a lot of talking points... [I heard a comment on public radio that I thought was funny. "As soon as Germany elects a Jewish Chancelor, they can come talk to the USA."] That's a curious thing to say because all of the American presidents have been and are Christian. The appropriate statement would have been "As soon as Germany elects a Chancellor of Turkish ethnicity..." If there is any racism occurring in Germany, it's against the Turks and Romas. And, Hainan57, I don't know where you have been in Germany but there isn't as much of a wide-spread anti-sentiment for Americans as you declare there are. You are also making over-generalized blind assumptions like those opinions printed in the German newspaper article. I mean for goodness sake, some 50 million Americans voted for Obama who is widely supported be 90% of the German population. So, it's safe to say they've always liked at least 50 million of us. And, the other 10% are probably from the Bavarian states (the most religious and most capitalistic) would probably have favored McCain. They're German, too. Furthermore, bringing up Nazi history in this topic is utterly irrelevant. Talk about a piss-poor example of Godwin's Law, heh. But if you want to go there, the Germans do acknowledge their past. It is heavily studied in their history books. Students are taken to one of the concentration camps to grasp the severity of WWII. They all know about it. As I've stated in previous topics, many of the Germany's citizens, even those who were too young during WWII or weren't even born, do not even raise their flags out of fear of appearing too nationalistic out of courtesy to their neighboring countries. The only time they've paraded their flags were during football games and the like. I did see a few flags raised on some farm plots between Frankfurt to Friedberg. No one is proud of the Nazi era. This statement goes for anyone who has never step outside their state or country's borders but unless you've visited or lived in another state or country long enough, do not over generalized. I mean, how fair is it for me to base all South Carolinan's intelligence on Miss South Carolina 2007? Yeah, there you go. On Obama being socialist, that brings me to a humorous statement that Gloria La Riva, a real socialist, of the Socialist and Liberation Party of America said. "Real socialists don't pal around with Warren Buffet." No kidding. On topic: "Does it anger you to see people be proud on a part-time basis? Or is it good to see excitement where there was once apathy?" That's quite a disgusting question to ask. Say, I had a father who was a gifted doctor. Then, he became a drug addict wasting his life away. Somehow, family members and myself were able to convince him to go to a drug rehabilitation facility. Afterwards, he was clean for several years and did humane volunteer work. I would have been proud before and after his drug addiction. My pride for him would have fallen during his drug addiction and it would be safe to say I would be ashamed of him and disassociate myself from him. The same goes for my love and pride of America and more particularly the American government. They fluctuate and they are not unconditional. I must stress that this is in no way akin to being fickle-minded. The Bush administration has let me down, but with the new President-Elect, Barack Obama, I feel a resurgence of hope. That isn't to say I won't be disappointed if Obama starts making the same crucial mistakes Bush did. I would be severely disapointed. I'm not about to be blindly patriotic or proud for any reason. At the same time, I would not disassociate myself from my citizenship. I know what type of American I am and those people in foreign countries who still hold onto their negative preconceived notions about me as an American after talking to me aren't worth my time getting mad and worried about. They're just as ignorant as the lowest common denominator here in America.
Meike Meike 8 years
Advah, I applaud you. And, yeah, I'm going to make a lot of talking points...[I heard a comment on public radio that I thought was funny. "As soon as Germany elects a Jewish Chancelor, they can come talk to the USA."]That's a curious thing to say because all of the American presidents have been and are Christian. The appropriate statement would have been "As soon as Germany elects a Chancellor of Turkish ethnicity..." If there is any racism occurring in Germany, it's against the Turks and Romas. And, Hainan57, I don't know where you have been in Germany but there isn't as much of a wide-spread anti-sentiment for Americans as you declare there are. You are also making over-generalized blind assumptions like those opinions printed in the German newspaper article. I mean for goodness sake, some 50 million Americans voted for Obama who is widely supported be 90% of the German population. So, it's safe to say they've always liked at least 50 million of us. And, the other 10% are probably from the Bavarian states (the most religious and most capitalistic) would probably have favored McCain. They're German, too.Furthermore, bringing up Nazi history in this topic is utterly irrelevant. Talk about a piss-poor example of Godwin's Law, heh. But if you want to go there, the Germans do acknowledge their past. It is heavily studied in their history books. Students are taken to one of the concentration camps to grasp the severity of WWII. They all know about it. As I've stated in previous topics, many of the Germany's citizens, even those who were too young during WWII or weren't even born, do not even raise their flags out of fear of appearing too nationalistic out of courtesy to their neighboring countries. The only time they've paraded their flags were during football games and the like. I did see a few flags raised on some farm plots between Frankfurt to Friedberg. No one is proud of the Nazi era.This statement goes for anyone who has never step outside their state or country's borders but unless you've visited or lived in another state or country long enough, do not over generalized. I mean, how fair is it for me to base all South Carolinan's intelligence on Miss South Carolina 2007? Yeah, there you go.On Obama being socialist, that brings me to a humorous statement that Gloria La Riva, a real socialist, of the Socialist and Liberation Party of America said. "Real socialists don't pal around with Warren Buffet." No kidding.On topic:"Does it anger you to see people be proud on a part-time basis? Or is it good to see excitement where there was once apathy?" That's quite a disgusting question to ask. Say, I had a father who was a gifted doctor. Then, he became a drug addict wasting his life away. Somehow, family members and myself were able to convince him to go to a drug rehabilitation facility. Afterwards, he was clean for several years and did humane volunteer work. I would have been proud before and after his drug addiction. My pride for him would have fallen during his drug addiction and it would be safe to say I would be ashamed of him and disassociate myself from him. The same goes for my love and pride of America and more particularly the American government. They fluctuate and they are not unconditional. I must stress that this is in no way akin to being fickle-minded. The Bush administration has let me down, but with the new President-Elect, Barack Obama, I feel a resurgence of hope. That isn't to say I won't be disappointed if Obama starts making the same crucial mistakes Bush did. I would be severely disapointed. I'm not about to be blindly patriotic or proud for any reason. At the same time, I would not disassociate myself from my citizenship. I know what type of American I am and those people in foreign countries who still hold onto their negative preconceived notions about me as an American after talking to me aren't worth my time getting mad and worried about. They're just as ignorant as the lowest common denominator here in America.
StolzeMama StolzeMama 8 years
Ha undave that is funnyAdvah, sorry I offended you, was not my intention. In reference to the Germans/nazis, It was a reference, they did not want to be treated poorly, nor do we..... And all I meant by that is that you would think they would be sympathetic and not petty. I for one can say I have never in my life called fries-french fries as they are not french. I was always just taught fries. My family is German and we always called them Pom frites. I have much love for Germans and their culture, I have visited there twice. When I went to France in 98 well before Bush, they were (with a few exceptions) rude to me the minute they heard me speak. So I think the french thing has always been weird. But I just think the Germans should be more aware of their own past before making blind assumptions about the US.
StolzeMama StolzeMama 8 years
Ha undave that is funny Advah, sorry I offended you, was not my intention. In reference to the Germans/nazis, It was a reference, they did not want to be treated poorly, nor do we..... And all I meant by that is that you would think they would be sympathetic and not petty. I for one can say I have never in my life called fries-french fries as they are not french. I was always just taught fries. My family is German and we always called them Pom frites. I have much love for Germans and their culture, I have visited there twice. When I went to France in 98 well before Bush, they were (with a few exceptions) rude to me the minute they heard me speak. So I think the french thing has always been weird. But I just think the Germans should be more aware of their own past before making blind assumptions about the US.
UnDave35 UnDave35 8 years
I heard a comment on public radio that I thought was funny. "As soon as Germany elects a Jewish Chancelor, they can come talk to the USA."
Advah Advah 8 years
Hainan, I'm offended by your comments. Yes, Americans are stereotyped. But isn't it a bigger stereotype to say "And to those countries who treated Americans like crap... shame on you. Need I remind you Germans especially.... Your country was responsible for not one but 2 of the deadliest wars of all times!!!!! And not to mention the US helping the French during both of those situations... It's like biting the hand that feeds you...a And germany received us foreign aid in 2004!!"It's dangerous to confuse Germany with Nazis. Nazis were behind WW2, not Germany. In the same way that I blame the Bush administration for the war in Iraq, not the whole population. Or avoid saying that all Americans are pro-Bush, because only one portion of the country voted for him.As for the US/French thing, I never thought I'd had to say something about that again. BUT that's just ridiculous! Lafayette went to the US and fought the Independence War for the US and against the UK - does that mean the US should have asked France for authorisation before sending their troops to Iraq?! Because the US helped Europe fight against the Nazis half a century ago doesn't mean one president has to abide by everything another president says.I don't know even know why I'm bothering writing all that...Oh, and please. Give me a break and stop calling Obama 'socialist'. Or go to the library and read a few politics/history books.
Advah Advah 8 years
Hainan, I'm offended by your comments. Yes, Americans are stereotyped. But isn't it a bigger stereotype to say "And to those countries who treated Americans like crap... shame on you. Need I remind you Germans especially.... Your country was responsible for not one but 2 of the deadliest wars of all times!!!!! And not to mention the US helping the French during both of those situations... It's like biting the hand that feeds you...a And germany received us foreign aid in 2004!!" It's dangerous to confuse Germany with Nazis. Nazis were behind WW2, not Germany. In the same way that I blame the Bush administration for the war in Iraq, not the whole population. Or avoid saying that all Americans are pro-Bush, because only one portion of the country voted for him. As for the US/French thing, I never thought I'd had to say something about that again. BUT that's just ridiculous! Lafayette went to the US and fought the Independence War for the US and against the UK - does that mean the US should have asked France for authorisation before sending their troops to Iraq?! Because the US helped Europe fight against the Nazis half a century ago doesn't mean one president has to abide by everything another president says. I don't know even know why I'm bothering writing all that... Oh, and please. Give me a break and stop calling Obama 'socialist'. Or go to the library and read a few politics/history books.
CaterpillarGirl CaterpillarGirl 8 years
I am not a fair weather patriotic american, I have always been proud to be an american no matter what, I myself dont care what other countries "think" about us (based on our president) its usually people who base their info on the media and we all know the media hates Bush.
CaterpillarGirl CaterpillarGirl 8 years
I am not a fair weather patriotic american, I have always been proud to be an american no matter what, I myself dont care what other countries "think" about us (based on our president) its usually people who base their info on the media and we all know the media hates Bush.
RyanRachelFan RyanRachelFan 8 years
This post is completely true.I´m Danish and I realise now, that the way I saw the USA had a LOT to do with the republican government. 85% of Danes would have voted for Obama a survey says.
RyanRachelFan RyanRachelFan 8 years
This post is completely true. I´m Danish and I realise now, that the way I saw the USA had a LOT to do with the republican government. 85% of Danes would have voted for Obama a survey says.
Witchy-Ways Witchy-Ways 8 years
Also, regarding the patriostism debate: You love your country, so you are patriotic. You don't love your country, why the hell would you still want to live there? I believe that there are very few Americans living in the US who aren't very patriotic at heart. And besides that, I have met many expats in Europe and even though they prefer living abroad for various reasons, they would never ever critize american values or the country itself (politics exluded of course). So, as I see them, even they are still patriotic because they're proud of being American (even if they don't live their anymore).
Witchy-Ways Witchy-Ways 8 years
I'm a European and going with the current definitions, most of the states in the European union are really only very mildly socialist. And to hear Republican analysts call Obama a socialist (or even better, call his truly conservative policy ideas "socialist"), is HILARIOUS.
organicsugr organicsugr 8 years
"I am not saying that I agree with all of these things, but if you are waiving the flag, saying that you are doing it because you are patriotic, and you're NOT following these rules . . . then you're being the opposite of what you're trying to be." You can still show patriotism with a flag without following every silly little rule of flag worship. You can be patriot by burning your flag. It's just a symbol, and it only means what each person thinks it means.
organicsugr organicsugr 8 years
"I am not saying that I agree with all of these things, but if you are waiving the flag, saying that you are doing it because you are patriotic, and you're NOT following these rules . . . then you're being the opposite of what you're trying to be."You can still show patriotism with a flag without following every silly little rule of flag worship. You can be patriot by burning your flag. It's just a symbol, and it only means what each person thinks it means.
hyzenthlay20 hyzenthlay20 8 years
This thread started out about the flag, so I am going to return to that idea, and not continue on with the "socialist" vein. 10 years ago or so I learned all about flag etiquette. The thing that drives me the MOST nuts about all of the flag questioning is the people who *think* they are being patriotic by flying the flag at all hours of the day and night. If your flag is not lit, DO NOT FLY IT AT NIGHT. Do not fly it in inclement weather. Do not wear the flag, or parts of it. If your flag becomes tattered it should be retired. By retired, I mean given to a group that will dispose of it properly. It should not be tossed in the trash. I am not saying that I agree with all of these things, but if you are waiving the flag, saying that you are doing it because you are patriotic, and you're NOT following these rules . . . then you're being the opposite of what you're trying to be. Then again, I don't think that Obama wasn't patriotic because he didn't wear the flag pin. Wearing the flag of your country has NOTHING to do with whether or not you are proud of who you are and where you come from. How does wearing a little lapel pin do that?
hyzenthlay20 hyzenthlay20 8 years
This thread started out about the flag, so I am going to return to that idea, and not continue on with the "socialist" vein.10 years ago or so I learned all about flag etiquette. The thing that drives me the MOST nuts about all of the flag questioning is the people who *think* they are being patriotic by flying the flag at all hours of the day and night. If your flag is not lit, DO NOT FLY IT AT NIGHT. Do not fly it in inclement weather. Do not wear the flag, or parts of it. If your flag becomes tattered it should be retired. By retired, I mean given to a group that will dispose of it properly. It should not be tossed in the trash. I am not saying that I agree with all of these things, but if you are waiving the flag, saying that you are doing it because you are patriotic, and you're NOT following these rules . . . then you're being the opposite of what you're trying to be.Then again, I don't think that Obama wasn't patriotic because he didn't wear the flag pin. Wearing the flag of your country has NOTHING to do with whether or not you are proud of who you are and where you come from. How does wearing a little lapel pin do that?
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