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Kids Flock to Hezbollah Shrine, Abu Ghraib to Open Museum

Two commemorative destinations established in the Middle East will help shape the historical consciousness of the region's newest generation. In Lebanon children flock to a shrine dedicated to Imad Mugniyah, the dead commander of Hezbollah, who is considered a martyr to some and a terrorist responsible for numerous bombings throughout the 1980s and 90s to others.

At the exhibit schoolchildren wait to see Mugniyah's bloodstained clothes, the shoes he died in, his cell phone, or the desk he sat at while he planned his attacks. Visitors also experience a multimedia exhibit chronicling Hezbollah's fight with Israel. The exhibit — which also includes a "victory bridge" made from artillery shells, a skeleton in uniform labeled "the invincible Israeli soldier" — must stay open until 1 a.m. to keep up with its popularity.

Meanwhile Iraq plans to reopen the infamous Abu Ghraib prison, where Saddam Hussein and members of the US military abused prisoners. The new Abu Ghraib prison will include a museum dedicated to exposing the crimes committed under Saddam. Stories like this make me think that efforts like Seeds of Peace, the summer camp which brings together children from enemy countries in the Middle East, are all the more important. If the forces of violence get to the next generation before those of peace, there is little hope for reconciliation in the region.

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ilanac13 ilanac13 7 years
although i don't agree with the nature of these 'shrines' i think that we have to remember the context that they are in. these are countries that have a large cultural support behind what's been done in the past and they honor this. just because we don't agree and we feel strongly against what's going on - that doesn't mean that there's not merit for them. i think that it's a bit too graphic for my taste and i think that the things they show it too extreme, but different strokes for different folks.
laurelm laurelm 7 years
Disgusting, it is these kinds of things that create more Muslim extremists.
michlny michlny 7 years
SICK
Marni7 Marni7 7 years
very interesting
briglass briglass 7 years
This is interesting. Thanks for continuing to discuss global issues while mainstream news outlets implode into a Palin-baby sinkhole
stephley stephley 7 years
"It was also unclear whether the museum would also document prisoner abuse by U.S. forces." It would undermine any value Abu Ghraib has for promoting change or peace to leave out an important, albeit distasteful, part of its history. I can think of a lot better ways of encouraging peace and understanding among young people than demonizing or idealizing their leaders.
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