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Laura Bush and Cindy McCain Appeal For Gulf State Aid

Day 1: Laura Bush and Cindy McCain Appeal For Gulf State Aid

True to their promise for official business only, the Republican Convention today focused on floor votes and finished with a brief appearance by First Lady Laura Bush and Cindy McCain. After a series of touching and well-done video messages from the Gulf State Governors (all of whom are Republican) both women appealed for aid to Hurricane victims.

Laura Bush said, "Our first priority for today and in the coming days is to ensure the safety and well-being of those living in the Gulf Coast Region. . . When such events occur, we are reminded that first, we are all Americans - and that our shared American ideals will always transcend political parties and partisanship."

Cindy McCain followed (wearing a fantastic, 50s-silhouette goldenrod dress) saying, "I would ask that each one of us commit to join together to aid those in need as quickly as possible. As John has been saying for the last several days, this is a time when we take off our Republican hats and put on our American hats."

To see what the party is doing during the convention to help, and video of the audience's reaction to Laura and Cindy,

.

The Republican party has formed a center where volunteers will make 80,000 "comfort packages," (including food and toiletries), a text message alert system, and a directory of websites to encourage Americans to donate to charities identified by the five Gulf Coast governors. The comfort packages will be packed by convention volunteers and shipped out Wednesday.

The crowd couldn't have been more enthusiastic to see the two speak.

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Great-Sommelier Great-Sommelier 7 years
It's rough, especially in the beginning. But it is worth it if you make it through. That is why tax laws are so important.
Cassandra57 Cassandra57 7 years
That was some great information about small business! I had a vague idea, but no specifics. Now I see why so many people don't consider it worthwhile for the return.
Cassandra57 Cassandra57 7 years
That was some great information about small business! I had a vague idea, but no specifics. Now I see why so many people don't consider it worthwhile for the return.
Great-Sommelier Great-Sommelier 7 years
I have friends visiting from Colorado this week. They made me swear to take them to a "fort worth" only place. A mom and pop type. I found it really hard to find one that wasn't barbecue. Even just ten years ago we had burger joints and Mexican restaurants coming out our ears. Now it is Chili's etc. But we will always have our barbecue and that makes me happy!
yesteryear yesteryear 7 years
yeah i come from a small business family too - and owned my own a few years back before joining the drudgery of office life. i am all for small business - particularly small retail/restaurants. i wish they weren't a dying breed. all of the character of our towns is disappearing with every new walmart and applebees. ugh. depressing!!
Great-Sommelier Great-Sommelier 7 years
Sorry, I went way off topic with that one! :oops:
Great-Sommelier Great-Sommelier 7 years
YY, you are speaking my language with small business tax issues. My husband and I each have our own businesses, and my parents did my whole life. Taxes make or break you in small business. If you try DBA you ride a slippery slope for an audit, your employees have to be independent contractors which means they pay almost tax and a half. If you switch and make them regular employees and become a corp, or sole proprietor you take the brunt of all those taxes they used to pay. That is why small business owners pay close attention to who will be writing their tax laws.
yesteryear yesteryear 7 years
good point, rac.
yesteryear yesteryear 7 years
good point, rac.
yesteryear yesteryear 7 years
not sure if all small businesses are getting reamed, but you're right that sole proprietorships do pay individual income tax on their profit above a certain level, and are allowed to write off all expenses. if they are in retail there are also sales taxes, etc., to contend with. this is why many choose to form an s-corporation (where you are simultaneously the sole employee and sole shareholder) to reduce medicare and ss tax. i'd like to see some of the development incentives we offer large companies shared with small ones -- some forward thinking cities do this through incubators (buildings where groups of professionals/businesspeople of a certain industry can share office space and ideas - usually in the tech sector), but there is no such thing as a shoe store incubator. these mom & pop stores should be given more breaks... at least that's what i think. to your points about economic development and communism... ha. um, russia is kind of a bad example though, right? because weren't they also using their economic power over the people to run a seriously corrupt government? i'm not advocating communism here, i'm just saying, yes russia ended up being a wasteland, but i don't think the blame rests solely on the shoulders of people getting fed up with high taxes and not working/achieving.
yesteryear yesteryear 7 years
not sure if all small businesses are getting reamed, but you're right that sole proprietorships do pay individual income tax on their profit above a certain level, and are allowed to write off all expenses. if they are in retail there are also sales taxes, etc., to contend with. this is why many choose to form an s-corporation (where you are simultaneously the sole employee and sole shareholder) to reduce medicare and ss tax. i'd like to see some of the development incentives we offer large companies shared with small ones -- some forward thinking cities do this through incubators (buildings where groups of professionals/businesspeople of a certain industry can share office space and ideas - usually in the tech sector), but there is no such thing as a shoe store incubator. these mom & pop stores should be given more breaks... at least that's what i think.to your points about economic development and communism... ha. um, russia is kind of a bad example though, right? because weren't they also using their economic power over the people to run a seriously corrupt government? i'm not advocating communism here, i'm just saying, yes russia ended up being a wasteland, but i don't think the blame rests solely on the shoulders of people getting fed up with high taxes and not working/achieving.
raciccarone raciccarone 7 years
Yes, that is true. But your argument should also include the wealthy. For instance, take the auto industry, if the big 3 weren't so heavily dependent on your tax dollars to continually bail themselves out, they would have created a fuel efficient car years ago to keep up with demand. When you subsidize companies you also take away their incentive to "build a better mousetrap". It works for macro as well as micro.
Cassandra57 Cassandra57 7 years
Thanks for the response, rac. It's difficult to point out other nations as examples, because we have very distinctive features here: diversity, geographic size, even a different business spirit. IMHO, some people support an equality of opportunity, and others support equality of outcome. However, I think that putting three times the resources into one student over another, in an attempt to get a comparable output, is inequitable on its face. Also, it's essentially funding mediocrity.
Cassandra57 Cassandra57 7 years
Thanks for the response, rac. It's difficult to point out other nations as examples, because we have very distinctive features here: diversity, geographic size, even a different business spirit. IMHO, some people support an equality of <i>opportunity</i>, and others support equality of <i>outcome</i>. However, I think that putting three times the resources into one student over another, in an attempt to get a comparable output, is inequitable on its face. Also, it's essentially funding mediocrity.
raciccarone raciccarone 7 years
Laine, I wasn't advocating any of these programs specifically, I was just pointing out that there are a million ways to create a more equitable society without reaching for The Communist Manifesto. If we had a flat tax in this nation at 10%, and everyone paid including corporations, we could erase the deficit and ultimately we'd all be paying less than we are now. I believe we're saying the same thing. We both want a fair taxation system and we want a nation unfettered by oppressive government tithes.
Cassandra57 Cassandra57 7 years
YY, I agree, we need a lot more education in skilled trades. Those are more stable (and harder to off-shore) careers than a lot of white-collar work. My understanding is that many small businesses are single proprietorships and therefore pay taxes at the personal rate. This means that if they do well, get get reamed. I also have a problem with local governments giving away the store to get big businesses to locate in their area. They bring jobs, but also strain infrastructure, and "loopholes" and incentives should be carefully examined. rac: I was just pointing out what you're actually saying. High taxes are a disincentive to hard work. Look at the economic wasteland left in former Soviet Russia. Japan has an exceptionally low birth rate, even lower if you examine births to single mothers, so they have entirely different concerns about poverty. They also have a long tradition of lifetime employment, unlike the US. The declining birth rate and aging population also affect the income distribution. The Swiss pay for their own health care, it's not a government benefit. (You inspired me to investigate.) They are mandated to have buy insurance, with government subsidies for the less well-off. They pay more than any other country, after the US, and costs rise about 5% per year. They also have government-enforced price controls. While good in principal, if they are too low, they will discourage innovation--which ultimately hurts the patient.
Cassandra57 Cassandra57 7 years
YY, I agree, we need a lot more education in skilled trades. Those are more stable (and harder to off-shore) careers than a lot of white-collar work. My understanding is that many small businesses are single proprietorships and therefore pay taxes at the personal rate. This means that if they do well, get get reamed. I also have a problem with local governments giving away the store to get big businesses to locate in their area. They bring jobs, but also strain infrastructure, and "loopholes" and incentives should be carefully examined. rac: I was just pointing out what you're actually saying. High taxes are a disincentive to hard work. Look at the economic wasteland left in former Soviet Russia. Japan has an exceptionally low birth rate, even lower if you examine births to single mothers, so they have entirely different concerns about poverty. They also have a long tradition of lifetime employment, unlike the US. The declining birth rate and aging population also affect the income distribution. The Swiss pay for their own health care, it's not a government benefit. (You inspired me to investigate.) They are mandated to have buy insurance, with government subsidies for the less well-off. They pay more than any other country, after the US, and costs rise about 5% per year. They also have government-enforced price controls. While good in principal, if they are too low, they will discourage innovation--which ultimately hurts the patient.
raciccarone raciccarone 7 years
Is anyone seriously afraid that communism is a threat? I'm talking about people who have billions of dollars and those who have nothing. The Marx argument is always the first thing people refer to when anyone talks about the disparity between the classes. There are a million variations on how to end poverty and hunger without reading Karl Marx. The Japanese have a much more equitable system of economic distribution and that works. The Swiss have a health care system that is not only fair to the patients but to the doctors. It never helps this debate when people start red baiting.
yesteryear yesteryear 7 years
rac i agree wholeheartedly. and laine, i mean more focus on small, locally owned business, entrepreneurship programs, worker education (and not college), and a serious review of the major sway sales tax revenue has over many local development decisions. in a world where cities are desperate for money to provide services, they are selling out left and right. countless studies have shown that locally owned businesses send money back into a local economy at a rate almost 3x as much as large corporations. so i say let's give the small businesses tax breaks and let the big ones pay more than their fair share. we've been cutting them slack this long - and we still seem to have a gigantic income gap. anywhoo, off to a meeting where i get to entice manufacturers to locate in my region through tax incentives. ironic...
yesteryear yesteryear 7 years
rac i agree wholeheartedly. and laine, i mean more focus on small, locally owned business, entrepreneurship programs, worker education (and not college), and a serious review of the major sway sales tax revenue has over many local development decisions. in a world where cities are desperate for money to provide services, they are selling out left and right. countless studies have shown that locally owned businesses send money back into a local economy at a rate almost 3x as much as large corporations. so i say let's give the small businesses tax breaks and let the big ones pay more than their fair share. we've been cutting them slack this long - and we still seem to have a gigantic income gap. anywhoo, off to a meeting where i get to entice manufacturers to locate in my region through tax incentives. ironic...
Cassandra57 Cassandra57 7 years
The key is in how you define "excess". I think what you're trying to say is, from each according to their ability, to each according to their need. I think that's already been tried. Read Karl Marx and study how effective communism has been.
Cassandra57 Cassandra57 7 years
The key is in how you define "excess". I think what you're trying to say is, from each according to their ability, to each according to their need. I think that's already been tried. Read Karl Marx and study how effective communism has been.
raciccarone raciccarone 7 years
When people are presented with the actual facts instead of raw emotional language, most agree. Who would disagree with a fair minded taxation system? Who would disagree with giving cheap health coverage to the poor? Who would disagree that we need to make more than we spend. I mean, basically all Americans (and by and large, people) want these things. Sadly, and I do really believe this, it always boils down to people who have an excess trying to keep it from being given to everyone else. Whether it's money, oil or drugs. Republicans and democrats are so beholden to the wealthy class that they can never affect change that will allow money to flow downwards. Almost everyone in the Senate is a millionaire so why would they ever vote against their own interests? That's why we need a third party not answerable to anyone.
Cassandra57 Cassandra57 7 years
YY: The "rich" generally do something to bring in that money. Even Paris Hilton "works". Raise taxes to excess, and they'll leave the country. Remember the English tax exodus? Everyone with money left the country, which did little for the government's revenues. I specifically said "entitlement programs" because I didn't want to trigger any of the emotional responses which crop up with specific mention of welfare, for instance. Surprisingly, I actually wish we could come to a fair and objective meeting of the minds, here. I am intrigued, what would the application of "small government principles to local economic issues" look like? Do you mean less local government?
Cassandra57 Cassandra57 7 years
YY: The "rich" generally do something to bring in that money. Even Paris Hilton "works". Raise taxes to excess, and they'll leave the country. Remember the English tax exodus? Everyone with money left the country, which did little for the government's revenues. I specifically said "entitlement programs" because I didn't want to trigger any of the emotional responses which crop up with specific mention of welfare, for instance. Surprisingly, I actually wish we could come to a fair and objective meeting of the minds, here. I am intrigued, what would the application of "small government principles to local economic issues" look like? Do you mean less local government?
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