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Miami's Spanish-Speaking Population Outnumber English Speakers

Miami's Spanish-Speaking Population Outnumber English Speakers

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Miami's Spanish-Speaking Population Outnumber English Speakers According to the AP: In many areas of Miami, Spanish has become the predominant language, replacing English in everyday life. Anyone from Latin America could feel at home on the streets, without having to pronounce a single word in English. But this situation, so pleasing to Latin American immigrants, makes some English speakers feel marginalized. In the 1950s, it's estimated that more than 80 percent of Miami-Dade County residents were non-Hispanic whites. But in 2006, the Census Bureau estimates that number was only 18.5 percent, and in 2015 it is forecast to be 14 percent. Hispanics now make up about 60 percent. According to the Census, 58.5 percent of the county's 2.4 million residents speak Spanish.

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KimBurnett KimBurnett 7 years
This Spanish speaking is out of control. I feel marginalized and I live in New Jersey; it's bad here too.
Brittneylb Brittneylb 7 years
The thing is, the article doesn't say that the majority of Miami residents speak Spanish ONLY, just that it is the predominant language. MIami does have a large immigrant population, but most people who grow up in the US learn English at school, even if they prefer to speak Spanish in their daily life. Spanish is common place in any city that has a large Hispanic population, Miami, L.A., Texas. I agree with you Jillness, I think bilingual cultures are so beneficial. Learning another language is really hard, but it's also very enlightening.
Jillness Jillness 7 years
"Really, its just an extension of Latin America so it doesn't surprise me at all that Hispanics outnumber whites there."The same is true for LA. There are more hispanics living here than white folk. Kind of interesting!
Jillness Jillness 7 years
"Really, its just an extension of Latin America so it doesn't surprise me at all that Hispanics outnumber whites there." The same is true for LA. There are more hispanics living here than white folk. Kind of interesting!
nicachica nicachica 7 years
Miami is an entirely different world! Really, its just an extension of Latin America so it doesn't surprise me at all that Hispanics outnumber whites there. I wonder if they have the breakdown of countries that the Latinos are from. I think you'd find that the majority are from Cuba and since the US gave asylum (and continues to give asylum) to any Cuban who touches American soil, this problem isn't going away anytime soon. Frankly, i get frustrated in Miami too! Cuban Spanish is very different from Nicaraguan Spanish and i can barely understand what people say down there! And half the words are Spanglish mixed in with Spanish so it makes it even harder. So yeah, in this case, Miami residents really do need to make an effort to speak English but there's absolutely no political will to do it so don't expect any changes soon...
nicachica nicachica 7 years
Miami is an entirely different world! Really, its just an extension of Latin America so it doesn't surprise me at all that Hispanics outnumber whites there. I wonder if they have the breakdown of countries that the Latinos are from. I think you'd find that the majority are from Cuba and since the US gave asylum (and continues to give asylum) to any Cuban who touches American soil, this problem isn't going away anytime soon. Frankly, i get frustrated in Miami too! Cuban Spanish is very different from Nicaraguan Spanish and i can barely understand what people say down there! And half the words are Spanglish mixed in with Spanish so it makes it even harder. So yeah, in this case, Miami residents really do need to make an effort to speak English but there's absolutely no political will to do it so don't expect any changes soon...
Kimpossible Kimpossible 7 years
But the thing is, in this particular article they're only talking about Miami, which is predominantly Hispanic. What about other cities that have large Asian or Philippino populations for example. Wouldn't it be better to teach the non-English speaking people to speak English, than it would be to try to teach the rest of the country 3 other languages? Or more since I know we are a melting pot, and as soon as they started giving lessons on different languages then I'm sure some other ethnic group would speak up and claim some sort of discrimination because their language isn't being taught.
Jillness Jillness 7 years
I really think it is a detriment to people when they don't know the language our laws are written in. I think it would be very difficult to suddenly have a legal matter, and not be able to specifically understand it. So much of the law and judicial branch is interpretation of words. I think that the bi-lingual community has a great ability to unite different cultures. I think if we all knew both languages, America would benefit in so many ways. We just need people to teach it, and that requires being bi-lingual.
Jillness Jillness 7 years
I really think it is a detriment to people when they don't know the language our laws are written in. I think it would be very difficult to suddenly have a legal matter, and not be able to specifically understand it. So much of the law and judicial branch is interpretation of <b> words.</b>I think that the bi-lingual community has a great ability to unite different cultures. I think if we all knew both languages, America would benefit in so many ways. We just need people to teach it, and that requires being bi-lingual.
UnDave35 UnDave35 7 years
Thank goodness Miami will be under water in a few years, and all these spanish-only speaking (citiens??) will be dispersed throughout America, where they can finally learn english.
UnDave35 UnDave35 7 years
Thank goodness Miami will be under water in a few years, and all these spanish-only speaking (citiens??) will be dispersed throughout America, where they can finally learn english.
stiletta stiletta 7 years
Maybe I'm in the minority myself, but if you live and work here, I really believe you need to speak fluent English.
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