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Poll: Do You Vote Like Your Parents?

My parents and I generally agree on important political issues. But, others infamously stray from the family. Rudi Giuliani's daughter joined a pro-Obama group on Facebook, and Hillary Clinton grew up in a Republican household.

Regardless of whether it's a good idea to share political preferences with children, I'm curious — does your vote mirror your parents'?

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janneth janneth 7 years
Parents should teach their children about politics, and sunscreen. Look at thoses faces, that hand.
CaterpillarGirl CaterpillarGirl 7 years
My parents are republicans, as am I, but they NEVER EVER talked politics to me growing up. I chose on my own. The georges are adorable!
CaterpillarGirl CaterpillarGirl 7 years
My parents are republicans, as am I, but they NEVER EVER talked politics to me growing up. I chose on my own.The georges are adorable!
luvhouse07 luvhouse07 7 years
Loving the hats :) on the voting -- we vote the same but think for ourselves
luvhouse07 luvhouse07 7 years
Loving the hats :) on the voting -- we vote the same but think for ourselves
luvhouse07 luvhouse07 7 years
Loving the hats :) on the voting -- we vote the same but think for ourselves
Trixie6 Trixie6 7 years
My parents didn't talk much about who they voted for, but they would always discuss political issues when any of us kids asked. They were, and still are, very good at pointing out both sides of an issue. They're both Republican & I tend to vote Republican as well. I discuss political issues with all of my kids, but I'm careful not to push my own beliefs as I thinks it's important for them to make up their own minds.
Trixie6 Trixie6 7 years
My parents didn't talk much about who they voted for, but they would always discuss political issues when any of us kids asked. They were, and still are, very good at pointing out both sides of an issue. They're both Republican & I tend to vote Republican as well. I discuss political issues with all of my kids, but I'm careful not to push my own beliefs as I thinks it's important for them to make up their own minds.
radarkitty radarkitty 7 years
I have to keep my political party a secret from my Dad. If he found out he wouldn't speak to me anymore. He'll say something like, "Well our guy lost." and I'll just agree with him to save the trouble. We both do agree on one thing however, and that would be we both hate Hillary!
ALSW ALSW 7 years
My mother is a Democrat, my father a Republican. But I tend to agree with each of them on certain issues and disagree with them on others.
mandy_frost mandy_frost 7 years
My father is a R. My mom is a D. Neither are straight ticket voters. Both impressed upon me the importance of voting the "person" not the party. However, my dad is becoming more liberal, much like his straight ticket D daughter. All three of us currently agree on Hillary, but if she doesn't get the nomination, I could see us splitting paths in the general... me for the D, my dad for McCain, and my mom deciding after she sees the VP choices.
plasticapple plasticapple 7 years
I was actually responding to Peepshow's comments about the hats. :) And thanks for the explanation on the hats Lainetm. I was thinking way too hard about that. lol
plasticapple plasticapple 7 years
I was actually responding to Peepshow's comments about the hats. :)And thanks for the explanation on the hats Lainetm. I was thinking way too hard about that. lol
trésjolie1 trésjolie1 7 years
eh, regarding the cute comment; I wasn't talking about the hats, I didn't notice them actually. I say just about only negative thing about the Bushes, our current President in particular, so once in a blue moon I try to say something nice. I just thought it was cute how they look so much alike.
trésjolie1 trésjolie1 7 years
eh, regarding the cute comment; I wasn't talking about the hats, I didn't notice them actually. I say just about only negative thing about the Bushes, our current President in particular, so once in a blue moon I try to say something nice. I just thought it was cute how they look so much alike.
Cassandra57 Cassandra57 7 years
The hats: Bush Sr. is president # 41, Jr. is president # 43. Of course, I could understand if you just didn't consider that cute. cabaker: My kids and I have a joke that membership cards to the Democratic Party are issued along with teaching credentials. And yes, their teachers have almost all been liberal, some to the point of being subversive and anti-American. Sorry, but IMO morals, ethics and behavioral standards should be taught in the home. Political discussions can follow after that foundation is laid. Of course, at school they're taught that belief in moral standards is being "judgmental" and hateful. We've noticed that even much-touted dress codes are selectively enforced. Ah, the joys of what passes for public "education" in Los Angeles!
Cassandra57 Cassandra57 7 years
The hats: Bush Sr. is president # 41, Jr. is president # 43. Of course, I could understand if you just didn't consider that cute. cabaker: My kids and I have a joke that membership cards to the Democratic Party are issued along with teaching credentials. And yes, their teachers have almost all been liberal, some to the point of being subversive and anti-American. Sorry, but IMO morals, ethics and behavioral standards should be taught in the home. Political discussions can follow after that foundation is laid. Of course, at school they're taught that belief in moral standards is being "judgmental" and hateful. We've noticed that even much-touted dress codes are selectively enforced. Ah, the joys of what passes for public "education" in Los Angeles!
plasticapple plasticapple 7 years
Oh, and I don't get those hats. What's cute about them?
plasticapple plasticapple 7 years
My mom is very conservative Republican (as is everyone in my family older than me). We have opposite views on every major issue, except health care. Although, I suspect she's becoming a little more Liberal these days.
hausfrau hausfrau 7 years
They say that most values and beliefs held by children are from the home. I'm leary of not talking politics with your kids in the interest of them "thinking for themselves" because then they go to school and most often only hear the liberal side of things... many teachers have no problem not letting your child think for themselves.Lain has it right though, its important to argue both sides or at least ask the question "Why?" when you child says they believe something.
hausfrau hausfrau 7 years
They say that most values and beliefs held by children are from the home. I'm leary of not talking politics with your kids in the interest of them "thinking for themselves" because then they go to school and most often only hear the liberal side of things... many teachers have no problem not letting your child think for themselves. Lain has it right though, its important to argue both sides or at least ask the question "Why?" when you child says they believe something.
demeter demeter 7 years
I used to when I was a little younger and didn't care about politics so I just usually agreed with what my mom said (my dad couldn't care less) but then I got older and more interested in politics and my views are different from my mother's now. She's a Dem and I'm a Republican.
Cassandra57 Cassandra57 7 years
My family background is *very* blue collar and I suspect largely Democratic. I'm the first in my family on either side to get a college degree, and although I'm not a mindless partisan voter, I'm frequently more on the Republican side. I find a lot of the Democratic proposals (like national health) impractical, unaffordable, and unrealistic. Also, frequently, interfering with my personal rights and freedoms. My kids are a high school sophomore and senior. I've generally never let them know how I vote, because I want them to think for themselves. When they take *any* side on an issue, I argue or try to explain the opposite. (Makes for some interesting drives to and from school, listening to talk radio!) So far they're turning out mostly conservative, and figuring out how I vote without me telling them. I point out the flaws of the conservatives, too! bailaoragaditana: If you agree with your mum on so many issues, why do you vote differently? Are the few different issues just extremely critical ones to you? Just trying to understand.
Cassandra57 Cassandra57 7 years
My family background is *very* blue collar and I suspect largely Democratic. I'm the first in my family on either side to get a college degree, and although I'm not a mindless partisan voter, I'm frequently more on the Republican side. I find a lot of the Democratic proposals (like national health) impractical, unaffordable, and unrealistic. Also, frequently, interfering with my personal rights and freedoms. My kids are a high school sophomore and senior. I've generally never let them know how I vote, because I want them to think for themselves. When they take *any* side on an issue, I argue or try to explain the opposite. (Makes for some interesting drives to and from school, listening to talk radio!) So far they're turning out mostly conservative, and figuring out how I vote without me telling them. I point out the flaws of the conservatives, too! bailaoragaditana: If you agree with your mum on so many issues, why do you vote differently? Are the few different issues just extremely critical ones to you? Just trying to understand.
Tech Tech 7 years
My dad is a staunch Republican in Texas and we <i>never</i> agree politically and have decided to just never discuss politics; however, the other night he told me he might be voting for Obama! I was shocked and so proud.
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