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3 Reasons Not To Let Your Preschooler Sip Your Drinks


3 Reasons Not To Let Your Preschooler Sip Your Drinks

Many parents let their kids sip wine or alcohol. They believe that exposing their kids to alcohol makes them less likely to abuse drinking later on. But there are also many who believe that alcohol and kids are two words that don't belong in the same sentence. These parents strictly forbid serving wine, beer or the hard stuff — even just a sip — to their children. Here, they share three reasons to forbid little kids from taking even a sip.

1. Even A Sip Could Lead to Abuse

Several Circle of Moms members point out that families aren't always aware of a genetic propensity for alcohol addiction, and that starting a child early could cause lifetime damage. "I'm a former alcoholic, so here's my view: you are doing your child, any age, a disservice to allow them even a sip," says Shari T. "My parents brought me up with the belief that allowing a sip at just special occasions (Christmas and Easter) could do no harm. But for me, those little sips were all it took for me to crave alcohol. Since you can't know if your child might be susceptible to alcoholism, why take a chance that you might be the one to lead them on that destructive path?"

Brittany G. agrees and fears it could lead to addiction later on. "Both my husband and myself have addictive personalities," she says. "Although we don't smoke, do drugs, or drink, we have other vices. We keep a close eye on our children because of this. My nephew at 2.5 was offered a sip of coffee, he then started asking for a sip daily. By [age] three he was addicted to caffeine. A sip can be all it will take, especially with such a small child.

Even in families without any trace of alcoholism or any other kind of addiction, some moms caution that a sip here and a sip there can promote a taste for alcohol. Speaking of the eventuality that a child will drink under peer pressure, MeMe explains, "I think if I let them have sips here and there, they may acquire a taste for it, which may make it more likely for them to enjoy the taste while trying to fit in."  

 

2. It’s Against the Law

Many Circle of Moms members in the anti-sip camp site the fact that is is legally prohibited to serve alcohol to a minor, and that they don't want to break the law. "It's illegal," period, says Brittney P. Michele D. adds: "Parents can indeed be prosecuted for giving their own underage children alcohol in any amounts," she says. 

Melina H. offers another reason not to break the law: "I never allow my children to drink alcohol and I do believe that is child abuse."

3. There's Nothing to Be Gained and a Lot to Lose

There are also many moms who believe that giving kids sips of alcohol blurs the line between the adult world and the kid world in ways that are harmful to children. "No, no, no," says Elizabeth D. emphatically. "No sips of any adult beverage. No beer, no wine, no wine coolers. Adult beverage means just that." 

Melina believe that giving your tot a sip of your drink, just because she asks, sets a bad precedent. It's never too early for a child to learn that they she can't have everything she asks for, she explains, offering also that, "If they are allowed to touch or have everything they want, they'll grow up with a false sense of entitlement."

Julie D., who has two young boys, agrees: "Why even give a sip? What is the point? That's right, there is none."

Finally, as Shari T. says, there's little to gain and potentially much to lose: "Why would parents even want to give their kids a sip? Why start them on that road to destruction when they are young? I make my kids wear helmets when they ride their bikes to protect their noggins until they are adults. Likewise, if I know that alcohol can impair their brain development (and it does), why would I want to encourage drinking it?"

(For the other point of view, see Why I Let My Toddler Taste Wine.)

Do you ever let your little ones sip from your drink?

Image Source: MikkelElbeck via Flickr/Creative Commons

The views expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily represent the views of, and should not be attributed to, POPSUGAR.

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