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Avoid Giving Birth on Halloween

Would You Try to Avoid a Halloween Birth? Many Women Do!

There's something scary about giving birth on October 31 — at least according to a new study conducted by Yale University's School of Public Health. Analyzing data collected across the US over an eleven-year period, researches found that fewer children are born on Halloween than any other average day. At the same time, Valentine's Day sees a higher than average rate of women giving birth. The study reports:
On Valentine's Day, which conveys positive symbolism, there was a 3.6 percent increase in spontaneous births and a 12.1 percent increase in Cesarean births. Whereas, on Halloween, which conveys negative symbolism, there was a 5.3 percent decrease in spontaneous births and a 16.9 percent decrease in Cesarean births.

The results of the study challenge the generally accepted notion that spontaneous birth is a natural, biological, and largely uncontrollable event, suggesting that the cultural beliefs of the expectant mama impact when she actually goes into labor.

What do you think? Would you try to mentally will yourself to avoid labor when the roads are clogged with trick-or-treaters, and the ER is filled with Halloween revelers?

Source: Thinkstock
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