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Baby Wellness: The Basics of Food Allergies

Lil Jayden James Federline was recently rushed to the hospital after suffering an allergic reaction to something he ingested. He is going to be OK, but food allergies are scary and can be a source of worry for parents — especially those with babies just starting to eat solids.

Luckily, there are a few ways to detect if your child is reacting to something she ate. According to the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), symptoms of an allergic reaction include: Skin problems (hives, itchy skin rashes, swelling), breathing problems (sneezing, wheezing, throat tightness), stomach symptoms (vomiting, diarrhea), and circulation problems (pale skin, light-headedness, loss of consciousness). Some symptoms occur right after eating while others take a few days, but BabyCenter recommends that you call 911 immediately if your baby has trouble breathing, swelling of the face and/or lips, or severe vomiting or diarrhea after eating. In the case of less severe symptoms, you should contact your pediatrician who will most likely refer you to an allergist since food allergies can often be hard to diagnose.

To find out if you can prevent your child from getting food allergies and how to pinpoint the culprit, just

.

Unfortunately there is not much you can do to prevent an allergy from occurring in your child; contrary to popular belief even breastfed babies develop allergies. One way to keep on top of allergies from the beginning is to introduce one new food at a time — then you'll be able to tell which food your baby is reacting to. On the flip side, the AAP recommends the "Elimination Diet," which involves removing all the suspect foods from your child's diet and monitoring to see if the allergic symptoms go away.

Even though there is no cure, the good news is that food allergies may not stick around forever. Arming yourself with the knowledge of what triggers the reaction will go a long way in keeping your baby happy and healthy.

Source

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Join The Conversation
kellys kellys 7 years
my daughter was/is so sensitive that i couldn't eat tomatoes (fresh or cooked) at all while i was breastfeeding or she'd have a reaction. tomatoes will be just before (or maybe after) peanuts in the foods we introduce to her.
Sarana Sarana 7 years
No one in my familie has food allergies, I am only allergic to whipcream. But it's not dangerous. It just makes me throw up, even a little bite.
MissSushi MissSushi 7 years
none of my family on either side, mine or my husbands, have any known allergies of any sort, so i have been pretty liberal in what ive introduced to my daughter. im pretty happy that so far we havnt found any allergies, though i know they can show up later
Greggie Greggie 7 years
Breastfeeding has never been credited with totally avoiding allergies. It can lower the risk, but in a child prone to allergies, it's not going to eliminate it by any means. I know the AAP has rethought its stand on delaying foods like peanuts to avoid allergies, but I still feel better delaying them anyway. We don't introduce eggs until well after a year because my FIL is severely allergic. My daughter appears to be sensitive to rice cereal but not allergic to it. However, a sensitivity can develop into a food allergy, so I avoid rice products altogether until her system becomes more mature.
Greggie Greggie 7 years
Breastfeeding has never been credited with totally avoiding allergies. It can lower the risk, but in a child prone to allergies, it's not going to eliminate it by any means. I know the AAP has rethought its stand on delaying foods like peanuts to avoid allergies, but I still feel better delaying them anyway. We don't introduce eggs until well after a year because my FIL is severely allergic. My daughter appears to be sensitive to rice cereal but not allergic to it. However, a sensitivity can develop into a food allergy, so I avoid rice products altogether until her system becomes more mature.
RosaDilia RosaDilia 7 years
I'm thankful my son is not allergic to any food but on the other hand my seven year old nephew is allergic to so many foods that it seems like he can't eat anything at all. What's interesting is that he is tested every six months because he seems to outgrow some and develop new ones. He's currently allergic to tomatoes so he's really bummed that he can't have pizza or spaghetti. He's allergic to almost every fruit except apples and the only vegetable he can eat are broccolli and corn. No cheese, regular milk, soy milk just rice milk and absolutely no peanuts.
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