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How Well Do You Know Your Carseat Safety?

Most hospitals do not let you take your baby home until they can see that you have a properly installed carseat in your vehicle. Try your knowledge by taking this test!
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How Well Do You Know Your Carseat Safety?

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Greggie Greggie 8 years
Oh and I agree that this is a poorly chosen picture when promoting carseat safety.
Greggie Greggie 8 years
Leg room is very unimportant, the legs being squished doesn't matter. The longer a child is rear-facing, the safer they'll be in general. I don't think #2 is misleading, but I do agree it could be worded better. I actually have a problem with the last question because of the wording. There are national and federal guidelines, they're just not laws in all states. And sadly, many states don't ensure that children are safe in cars. I chose the lowest percentage in #4 and got it wrong. But I chose it because based on what I see, people are very lax about carseat safety. Even 84% seemed high to me.
Greggie Greggie 8 years
Leg room is very unimportant, the legs being squished doesn't matter. The longer a child is rear-facing, the safer they'll be in general.I don't think #2 is misleading, but I do agree it could be worded better. I actually have a problem with the last question because of the wording. There are national and federal guidelines, they're just not laws in all states. And sadly, many states don't ensure that children are safe in cars.I chose the lowest percentage in #4 and got it wrong. But I chose it because based on what I see, people are very lax about carseat safety. Even 84% seemed high to me.
Mommy-of-Three Mommy-of-Three 8 years
That is a common misconception about the legs being squished, however, there has never been a documented case of a child's legs breaking as a result of rear facing in a crash. Even if the legs were to break they can be put in a cast and heal while a broken neck cannot. Most children are comfortable with their legs crossed or stretched up against the seat. I can't seem to post the links here but if you look up extended rear facing you should be able to find additional information.
Mommy-of-Three Mommy-of-Three 8 years
There has never been a documented case of a child's legs breaking from being rear facing in a crash. Even if a leg were to break, a leg can be put in a cast and heal, a broken neck cannot. Most children are comfortable sitting with their legs crossed or stretched up against the seat. Here are some links for additional information. Hope they are helpful ! http://www.cpsafety.com/articles/stayrearfacing.aspx http://www.childrestraintsafety.com/rear-facing.html http://youtube.com/watch?v=kRP7ynNI8mI
Mommy-of-Three Mommy-of-Three 8 years
There has never been a documented case of a child's legs breaking from being rear facing in a crash. Even if a leg were to break, a leg can be put in a cast and heal, a broken neck cannot. Most children are comfortable sitting with their legs crossed or stretched up against the seat. Here are some links for additional information. Hope they are helpful !http://www.cpsafety.com/articles/stayrearfacing.aspxhttp://www.childrestraintsafety.com/rear-facing.htmlhttp://youtube.com/watch?v=kRP7ynNI8mI
DesignRchic DesignRchic 8 years
Mommy of Three, isn't the reason for children over a year old and 20 pounds to be front faced is because there might not be enough leg room if rear-faced? I'm only asking because it seems like a good idea to extend the rear-faced seats, but then the kid's legs can be scrunched up against the seat. :?
Mommy-of-Three Mommy-of-Three 8 years
Try to find a new picture. The baby looks too young to be forward facing and overhead shield car seats are not the safest choice. The bar or tray may actually cause harm to a baby in a crash because trays rarely contain enough padding to prevent head or chest injuries when the baby strikes the tray at car accident forces. At least one child has died as a result of a head injury caused by contact with an overhead shield seat.
Mommy-of-Three Mommy-of-Three 8 years
Try to find a new picture. The baby looks too young to be forward facing and overhead shield car seats are not the safest choice. The bar or tray may actually cause harm to a baby in a crash because trays rarely contain enough padding to prevent head or chest injuries when the baby strikes the tray at car accident forces. At least one child has died as a result of a head injury caused by contact with an overhead shield seat.
Mommy-of-Three Mommy-of-Three 8 years
Question number 2 is misleading. 1 year old and 20 pounds is the MINIMUM for forward facing. It doesn't matter that children can ride forward facing, they should not be. Extended rear facing is much safer and is now recommended by the AAP. Parents, please do your research and consider extended rear facing for your children. My 22 month old rides rear facing and I know she is much safer.
faerymagick15 faerymagick15 8 years
I got that percentage one wrong! Off by 5%!
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