Skip Nav
Personal Essay
All of the Reasons I Hated Being an Only Child
Facebook
The 1 Move That Made Me a Better Mom, Instantly
List
19 Fun Family Movies For Valentine’s Day That Your Kids Will Love

Off the Bottle

Bye Bye Bottle

We've seen Suri Cruise tote her bottle around town since she was a wee one and many other tots still hit the bottle in their older years.

Prior to my wee one's first birthday, my doctor talked to me about transferring to a sippy cup. She explained that drinking from a bottle causes the milk, formula or juice to collect causing “baby-bottle” tooth decay.

To see what the AAFP recommends,

.

The American Academy of Family
Physicians
provides five tips to avoid baby-bottle tooth decay:

  • Put your child to bed with a bottle of plain water, not milk or juice.
  • Stop nursing when your child is asleep or has stopped sucking on the bottle.
  • Try not to let your child walk around using a bottle of milk or juice as a pacifier.
  • Start to teach your child to drink from a cup at about 6 months of age. Plan to stop using a bottle by 12 to 14 months at the latest.
  • Don't dip your child's pacifier in honey or sugar.

Source

Around The Web
Gwyneth Paltrow Babysitting Blue Ivy at the Super Bowl 2016
Beyonce and Blue Ivy at the Super Bowl 2016
Kelly Clarkson's Daughter in Unaired Super Bowl Commercial
Katie Holmes and Suri Cruise Photo September 2015
Katie Holmes Posts Picture of Suri Cruise's Sidewalk Art
Beyonce and Blue Ivy Behind-the-Scenes "Formation" Pictures
Suri Cruise Ice Cream Sightings

POPSUGAR, the #1 independent media and technology company for women. Where more than 75 million women go for original, inspirational content that feeds their passions and interests.

Join The Conversation
lickety-split lickety-split 7 years
"don't dip your child's pacifier in sugar or honey", wonder if 100 proof is okay.
mother2 mother2 7 years
I have to say that my big thrill of having my twins on the sippy cups versus the bottles is that I have my top dishwasher rack back! No more nipples and bottle rings and bottles taking up all the space! :) I think every child is different. My son and daughter didn't accept it at the same time, and I just figured they will go for the cup when they are ready. I found they resisted when I pushed them too much. They both relented around 14-15 months old.
mother2 mother2 7 years
I have to say that my big thrill of having my twins on the sippy cups versus the bottles is that I have my top dishwasher rack back! No more nipples and bottle rings and bottles taking up all the space! :)I think every child is different. My son and daughter didn't accept it at the same time, and I just figured they will go for the cup when they are ready. I found they resisted when I pushed them too much. They both relented around 14-15 months old.
rgrl rgrl 7 years
I'm actually surprised to see how many people who commented are using the live and let live motto. I have seen so many bottle Nazis comment on Suri and I am sick of it too. I think when you are a parent you start to realize that you can't plan how everything will work out in your child's life, they are a person too who sometimes has needs and wishes beyond our rules. Of course there are limits... (Leah Rimini anyone?).
dmpls83 dmpls83 7 years
lol..was that even related to this article?
dmpls83 dmpls83 7 years
i've been breastfeeding since my bby was born, he's 8 months now and i've been wondering about what it'll be like to try and wean him..i've decided i will let him do it on his own though...but we'll see, i mean, i wouldn't do it past 2 years. hopefully he's one of those kids that stops on his own in a few months..
anniekim anniekim 7 years
*lucky*
anniekim anniekim 7 years
*lucky*
anniekim anniekim 7 years
This is such a case by case basis thing. I've been luchy with bottles--my oldest would never take the bottle and the 2nd gave it up voluntarily at 10 months. I can't take credit for it really, the kids made their own choices.So long as the child is thriving, why judge?
anniekim anniekim 7 years
This is such a case by case basis thing. I've been luchy with bottles--my oldest would never take the bottle and the 2nd gave it up voluntarily at 10 months. I can't take credit for it really, the kids made their own choices. So long as the child is thriving, why judge?
macneil macneil 7 years
Oh god, this again! She's not that old! It's not killing her! She looks happy and healthy and there's plenty of time for her to give it up - right now it's obviously comforting her. I do a lot of dumb stuff I shouldn't do with my kid, but should I feel superior because she uses a cup? Well, why don't I just feel great about it, and hate all the mothers who can't make the change, that's the best type of parenting of all.
Dbtabm Dbtabm 7 years
I wish we could stop the mommy wars of being SO judgmental about everything. Is it time for Suri to stop using the bottle, probably, but that's her parents decision and who knows what's going on. I'm in the process of trying to get my 11 month old off the bottle and it is SO hard. She screams and refuses to drink anything. She's been sick so I don't want her to get dehydrated. All I'm saying is that nothing's as easy as it seems in the baby books and guidelines. I'm sure they are trying to do the best for her. I completely understand the APA guidelines and I'm sure they're correct but I also know that parenting is not easy.
Twinkle1 Twinkle1 7 years
My son didn't get off the bottle until he was two and his teeth are perfectly fine. :shrug:
Greggie Greggie 7 years
The "baby bottle" tooth decay is if you give it to them at night and it pools in their mouth. Not if they're having it throughout the day, when saliva is constantly flowing and forcing swallowing, or when you're eating and also having swallowing. Two is nowhere near a "ridiculous" age for a bottle in my opinion. The only part of it that worries me is the possibility that they're giving her the Scientology formula. But I have no idea if they are or not, so their bottle, their business.
Greggie Greggie 7 years
The "baby bottle" tooth decay is if you give it to them at night and it pools in their mouth. Not if they're having it throughout the day, when saliva is constantly flowing and forcing swallowing, or when you're eating and also having swallowing. Two is nowhere near a "ridiculous" age for a bottle in my opinion. The only part of it that worries me is the possibility that they're giving her the Scientology formula. But I have no idea if they are or not, so their bottle, their business.
RosaDilia RosaDilia 7 years
Ummmm, my nephew is six and my sis still gives him a bottle in the morning and right before he goes to bed. When I, sort of intervened, she told me to mind my business. So now i'm quite careful how i'm going to pass judgement on how parents raise their children.
roxtarchic roxtarchic 7 years
I wasnt aware that I should plan on weaning the lil guy by 12 14 months at the latest... I'm sure I would have been advised by our doc, but I think different children have different needs... i think if suri is jet setting along w/her parents all over the world, then some familiarity and comfort which that bottle may provide for her once in awhile, that doesnt seem like a bad thing to me... if on the other hand, she's throwing back the bottle all the time... that's different.
duck-duck-goose duck-duck-goose 7 years
I'm not quick to criticize other parents, because I know (from personal experience) that we can never know the whole story and that every child is different.My first child was fully weaned from the bottle by fourteen months, but he only ever drank juice from a cup and never from a bottle. He didn't wean as quickly because I had my second child just days after his first birthday and he was adjusting to the change.My second child was physically disabled and profoundly developmentally delayed. He was not weaned from the bottle until he was two, but that is because he was not physically able to drink from a sippy cup until that time. (He could receive fluid from a soft nipple, but he was not strong enough to get it from a spill-proof stopper, but a sippy top with no stopper would drown him because it rushed out too quickly.)His suck and swallow functions did not develop properly. But he was not able to manage solid foods until nearly one year old because he didn't develop the ability to properly chew until then, and he had very a weak swallow. (And that was after several months of Early Intervention and different therapies.)My third child was my easiest. He was weaned from the bottle before his first birthday. It posed no challenge to him (and we were grateful for that!)My youngest is only four months and has not started on solids or on juice, so we have not introduced the sippy cup. So. . . yeah, Suri is getting older, and it is easy for us to criticize her parents and wonder why she still has the bottle, but I don't think we know all the particulars.
duck-duck-goose duck-duck-goose 7 years
I'm not quick to criticize other parents, because I know (from personal experience) that we can never know the whole story and that every child is different. My first child was fully weaned from the bottle by fourteen months, but he only ever drank juice from a cup and never from a bottle. He didn't wean as quickly because I had my second child just days after his first birthday and he was adjusting to the change. My second child was physically disabled and profoundly developmentally delayed. He was not weaned from the bottle until he was two, but that is because he was not physically able to drink from a sippy cup until that time. (He could receive fluid from a soft nipple, but he was not strong enough to get it from a spill-proof stopper, but a sippy top with no stopper would drown him because it rushed out too quickly.) His suck and swallow functions did not develop properly. But he was not able to manage solid foods until nearly one year old because he didn't develop the ability to properly chew until then, and he had very a weak swallow. (And that was after several months of Early Intervention and different therapies.) My third child was my easiest. He was weaned from the bottle before his first birthday. It posed no challenge to him (and we were grateful for that!) My youngest is only four months and has not started on solids or on juice, so we have not introduced the sippy cup. So. . . yeah, Suri is getting older, and it is easy for us to criticize her parents and wonder why she still has the bottle, but I don't think we know all the particulars.
Gabriela14815884 Gabriela14815884 7 years
I personally don't see what the big deal is, I have seen 4 yr olds with bottles (not that thats ok!) and I think she still has a little time before it gets ridiculous. My doctor told me the same thing with the sippy cups but I could not get my daughter to take it at 6,7,8 months. She is 16 months now and is at a 50/50 split - sometimes the kids just don't like the cups, maybe that is Suri's issue?
Gabriela14815884 Gabriela14815884 7 years
I personally don't see what the big deal is, I have seen 4 yr olds with bottles (not that thats ok!) and I think she still has a little time before it gets ridiculous. My doctor told me the same thing with the sippy cups but I could not get my daughter to take it at 6,7,8 months. She is 16 months now and is at a 50/50 split - sometimes the kids just don't like the cups, maybe that is Suri's issue? <Shrug>
faerymagick15 faerymagick15 7 years
we started teaching the sippy cup around 7-8 months with both kids. By a year they were both off the bottle completely. I think 2 is a bit old to still be on a bottle. Hope they have an easy time with Suri.
Latest Moms
X