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Why I Don't Make Junk Food Into an Issue

Why I Don't Make Junk Food Into an Issue

Why I Don't Make Junk Food Into an Issue

I never thought I'd allow my children to eat as much junk as they do. When my first daughter was born, she was breastfed exclusively for six months, and then continued to be breastfed until she was 20 months. Once she started eating solids, I insisting on everything that passed her lips being organic, without any refined grains, added salt, or sugar.

That lasted until she was about 16 months old and she started daycare. Then, battles ensued at mealtimes. Finally, I had to accept that I was turning eating into a control issue, which was exactly what I hadn't wanted to do. My daughter's "junk" tooth (for both sweet and salty treats) made me crazy, but my interference only made it worse. I began to ease off a bit and tried to simply model healthy eating for her.

 

When my youngest daughter was born, I was much more relaxed about the whole thing, and she was inevitably introduced to 'treat' foods much earlier than her sister was. Ironically — or perhaps because of this — she doesn't gravitate towards junk nearly as much as her sister.

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Even though I am very careful not to bring much junk into our house (only whole grains, rarely any candy or chips, no pop and very little juice, and baked goods are whole grain, mostly home-made, with no sugar, etc.), they still seem to get tons of it on a regular basis from their grandparents and other relatives, at school/daycare and at birthday parties and other celebrations. It makes me cringe, but I've learned that the more of an issue you make it, the more of a problem it becomes. The last thing I want to do is be too restrictive and foster an unhealthy relationship with food in my daughters. Again, I am banking on the fact that me and my husband's healthy eating habits will leave an impression on our children and that eventually, they will embrace healthy food and the importance of nutrition.

What's your junk food policy?

The views expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily represent the views of, and should not be attributed to, POPSUGAR.

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TinaBermudez TinaBermudez 4 years
Food of any sort is not a novelty in our home. Fruit is displayed, available and visible while "treats" I keep in the pantry. My children are not restricted, other than directed not to eat the treats before a healthy meal. They gravitate to the healthy choices more readily than the "treats". I taught for many years before I had my own children and watched as children who were regularly restricted from "junk food" gorged themselves on the "treats" their friends brought to school, as those children often gave them up or traded them for something else.
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