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Are the Self-Identified Labels of "Dog People" vs. "Cat People" Unrelated to Pet Ownership?

Are the Self-Identified Labels of "Dog People" vs. "Cat People" Unrelated to Pet Ownership?

The assertion of "I'm a dog person" or "I'm a cat person" comes up between friends and strangers alike, as the common descriptor loaded with implications causes many — even non-pet owners — to identify as one or the other. In a quest to get to the bottom of this, a recent study went so far as to poll about 4,500 people to measure their personality inclinations in five areas: openness, conscientiousness, extroversion, agreeableness, and neuroticism.
Since previous research showed these five dimensions to encompass most personality traits, participants answered questions and also indicated whether they consider themselves cat people, dog people, both, or neither. Interestingly, the personality findings did not have anything to do with their actual pets but did have to do with their original assertions. See the results when you read more.

According to the study:

It turns out that the "dog people" — based on how people identified themselves, not on what animals they actually own — tend to be more social and outgoing, whereas "cat people" tend to be more neurotic but "open," which means creative, philosophical, or nontraditional in this context.

Could this be a state of mind more than an actuality? Share your thoughts on the results in the comments below!

Source: Getty
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