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Breaking Brand Loyalty

How to Break Your Brand Loyalty Habit

You might favor a particular brand because of nostalgia or because your friends swear by it, but the truth is the generic brands are worth looking at too. Not only are they cheaper, but they usually are of the same quality. Lifehacker advises to treat your brand loyalty as a habit:

"In order to get over brand loyalty you shouldn't necessarily have, you need to look at it like a bad habit. We've discussed ways to break a bad habit, and many of those strategies apply here as well. You're not trying to kick your fingernail munching issues, but you are attempting to let go of something that brings you comfort through familiarity and letting go will make you anxious all the same. Here's what to do.

First things first, you need to understand how your brand loyalty actually affects you. Perhaps you're regularly frustrated by the use of a particular product or you're overpaying for brand-name medicine when you can get the exact same thing for less when you buy a store-brand alternative. Make a list of these problems so you have a concrete example available next time you're shopping. This may seem a little silly, as you're basically making a list to remind you not to buy a new Blackberry, Tylenol, or whatever else, but that's because it seems like a silly problem you shouldn't even have. The thing is, if you're frustrated or spending too much or having other difficulties because of what you buy, it's a real problem for you and you'll be causing yourself more trouble by ignoring it."

Brand loyalty is founded more out of defending your choices and self image rather than being loyal to a company, says Science Daily. Customers have become so involved in the brand to the point where they become attached to it and associate themselves with the brand. In other words, it's not really the company or the product that's inspiring you to be loyal; it's because you feel so personally linked to it that it's hard to backtrack.

Are there any particular brands that you stay loyal to?

Source: Thinkstock
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