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How to Ask About Work Hours in a Job Interview

Ask Savvy: How Do I Ask About Work Hours in an Interview?

This reader posted in our anonymous Savvy Confessions group wondering how to bring up work hours in a job interview. Do you have any advice for her?

I know that we shouldn't mention work hours in an interview, but it's really important to me as a new mom. I would ideally like regular 9 to 5 hours. Previously, I was in finance so I used to work from 9 to 8. I'm looking for a finance-related job, but I'm more concerned about the work hours rather than the pay. I think I have a pretty robust resume. I graduated from an ivy league university and worked at one of the big banks as an investment banker. I'm not looking to climb the corporate ladder, but I'm more dedicated toward spending time with my new daughter.

Do you think it's OK for me to ask about work hours in an interview as a new mom? Is there any way of bringing up the issue in a tasteful way?

Pose your own anonymous questions or off-load your work confessions by posting in the Savvy Confessions group, and I'll find the right expert to help you out.

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jadenirvana jadenirvana 4 years
Asking "What are the core hours?" is a totally standard question and you should perfect valid asking it. I would go for specific questions rather than "Does your company value work/life balance?" I've never once had a manager say "Actually we despise work/life balance and you'll be working night and day," but I've had many jobs where that turned out to be the case. I would make my questions as specific as possible, and maybe even chat with a few employees or look on Glassdoor to find out the real deal.
beachgalone beachgalone 4 years
I would simply ask. It's important to remember that you are interviewing them as well. Everyone has terms to lay out and you need to respect yourself and your needs. We spend most of our time working. Put yourself first and show confidence. if they have any problems with that, it's not a good place to work.
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