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Lottery Winner Stories

Brilliant or Baffling: Giving Away Your Lottery Winnings

Imagine winning $11.3 million in the lottery. Then picture giving it all away to charity. A retired Canadian couple did just that after they won the lottery in July, and their donation spree is almost up, because most of their winnings has been given away. "What you've never had, you never miss," Violet Large, 78, said.

The money was actually more of a burden than a boon, because the couple fretted over being scammed by "crooked people." Violet told reporters that giving the money away to family and nonprofits like the Red Cross and the Salvation Army made the couple "feel good" and that there is "so much good being done with that money." The generous duo are, however, keeping two percent of the money for their emergency fund.

The ending to their lucky story seems a lot happier than other lottery winners. British lottery winner Keith Gough, 58, drank himself to death because he was bored after he quit his job as a baker. Gough had said in a previous interview that "without routine in my life I started to spend, spend, spend. In the end I was just bored."

What do you think of Violet and her husband's decision to give away all their winnings? Do you think it's a great idea, or is it mind boggling?

 

Image Source: Thinkstock
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skigurl skigurl 5 years
I just read the blurb on the link:They took care of family first and then began delivering donations to the two pages' worth of groups they had decided on, including the local fire department, churches, cemeteries, the Red Cross, the Salvation Army, hospitals in Truro and Halifax, where Violet underwent her cancer treatment, and organizations that fight cancer, Alzheimer's and diabetes. The list goes on and on.and they kept 2% for a rainy day. so they kept over $200K for themselves (which is more than enough at age 78), and they took care of family first. Perfect, I think they did a great thing and hopefully others do the same in the future!
skigurl skigurl 5 years
I just read the blurb on the link: They took care of family first and then began delivering donations to the two pages' worth of groups they had decided on, including the local fire department, churches, cemeteries, the Red Cross, the Salvation Army, hospitals in Truro and Halifax, where Violet underwent her cancer treatment, and organizations that fight cancer, Alzheimer's and diabetes. The list goes on and on. and they kept 2% for a rainy day. so they kept over $200K for themselves (which is more than enough at age 78), and they took care of family first. Perfect, I think they did a great thing and hopefully others do the same in the future!
skigurl skigurl 5 years
I also wouldn't give it all away since I am in my 20s. But I like their take on the situation, since they are 78, it would be fun to give to others if you knew you didn't need the money and you are on your way out anyway.That said, I sure hope they helped out their families financially. If I were 78 and had children and grandchildren I would make sure each kid had a fund for education and each family had their house paid off so they could live comfortably.
skigurl skigurl 5 years
I also wouldn't give it all away since I am in my 20s. But I like their take on the situation, since they are 78, it would be fun to give to others if you knew you didn't need the money and you are on your way out anyway. That said, I sure hope they helped out their families financially. If I were 78 and had children and grandchildren I would make sure each kid had a fund for education and each family had their house paid off so they could live comfortably.
Carri Carri 5 years
That's really thoughtful of them, but I wouldn't give it all away. I'm in my early 30s and have a long life ahead of me, and I would want to make sure my husband and I aren't working when we're 80. The first thing I would do is hire a financial planner because there is no way I'd know how to handle that kind of money.
Carri Carri 5 years
That's really thoughtful of them, but I wouldn't give it all away. I'm in my early 30s and have a long life ahead of me, and I would want to make sure my husband and I aren't working when we're 80. The first thing I would do is hire a financial planner because there is no way I'd know how to handle that kind of money.
RoaringSilence RoaringSilence 5 years
May I ask why they were playing, then?
amber512 amber512 5 years
I may have seen too many specials about previous lottery winners, but this sounds like a great idea! I'd probably put a good chunk into savings, pay off debt, and buy a house, but giving money to charities that really need it (and that you trust) sounds great.
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