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Most Overlooked Wedding Expenses

Wedding Expenses You're Most Likely to Overlook

We're happy to present this guide from WeddingChannel.com.

When budgeting for a wedding, it’s easy to remember the large categories, such as the venue, catering, flowers, cake, and, of course, the dress. However, there are certain things that often get overlooked and can add up to a hefty sum if not planned for properly. Here are some of the most common added expenses that you should be aware of in order to avoid any unwelcome surprises at the end of the night.

Tips
Before you sign any of your vendor contracts, make sure that they specify whether gratuity is included. Vendors who own their own businesses don't expect tips as they've already included everything in their initial negotiations with you. However, when it comes to the reception venue, you should ask the site manager about the policies for tipping the waitstaff, bartenders, and parking valets. Many catering companies already include tips, which they divide up between the workers. If tips aren't included, expect to pay between 15 and 20 percent of the total catering bill. Those who deliver the flowers and the cake should also be tipped between $5 and $10. It's not necessary to tip your officiant, but if he or any other vendor has done an extraordinary job, you can send a note of appreciation and gift certificate later on. Don’t forget to include tips for coat checkers and powder room attendants as well.

To see the rest of the tips, keep reading.

Parking
Your guests shouldn't be responsible for any parking costs. Ask the reception site what the parking costs are and budget in the adequate amount for validations, as well as tips for the valets.

Corkage Fee
Because alcohol is very lucrative for venues, most places will try to deter you from bringing in your own wine by charging a high corkage fee. If you're planning to buy alcohol from outside, prepare to pay an additional $10 to $25 for each bottle that’s opened.

Cake-Cutting Fee
Usually reception sites won't charge a cake-cutting fee if you order directly from their cake vendor. However, if you're bringing in a cake made by your own baker, the cutting fee can add up to about a dollar per slice.

Overtime Fees
Your vendors will most likely charge you a fee if they have to work more hours than you initially agreed on. Ask your reception site what the rules are if you go over your allotted time, and make sure any overtime costs are clearly spelled out in all of your vendor contracts.

More from WeddingChannel.com:
Browse Through 100s of Wedding Day Photos
Stay Out of the Red With This Budget Calculator
8 Surprising Ways to Save (Big!) on Your Wedding

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