Skip Nav

Should You Invite Your Boss and Co-Workers to Your Wedding?

Should Your Guest List Include Your Boss and Co-Workers?


Ah, the guest list — something that should be so simple in theory that can often turn into a nightmare of political distress, and is the cause of so many lamenting brides-to-be wishing they could just elope. While the average guest list has 153 names on it, that number doesn't seem so forgiving when you take in to account all of the family and friends whom without your event would feel incomplete. The question of inviting your boss and your co-workers is one that can be tougher to solve than the kid question because of the possible repercussions, and the last thing you want to face when you get back from your honeymoon is to be met with awkwardness at work. To see my take on whether or not office folks should receive a coveted place on your guest list, just read more.

It's obvious that you'll invite the friends you've made at work who also serve as friends outside of the office. They know your fiancé's last name, and not just from asking what your new last name will be and if you're going to take it. But just as you have friendly acquaintances that fall into a gray zone in your personal life, there are usually co-workers who also fit this bill of uncertainty. You don't want to hurt anyone's feelings, but your wedding is expensive and the guest list isn't superelastic.

Some jobs are much more political in nature than others, and the higher up you get on the office food chain the more sensitive you'd be to inviting your colleagues. Unless you have these obvious obligations to inviting certain people out of respect for their position and yours, it's OK to only invite those co-workers who you call your friends. This can be trickier if you work in a very small office, but aside from making the effort not to single anyone out as the only person not invited, the general rule still applies. Be aware of those around you once your invitations have been sealed and delivered — you may even want to ask the few invited to keep their invitee status to themselves at work and hold the wedding chatter to a minimum.

Just because someone tells you they're happy for you, it doesn't mean they expect a wedding invitation. It's your (expensive) wedding, and it's a personal affair — remember that while being sensitive to others is a great quality, it doesn't mean you should feel pressured to expand your intimate wedding of close friends and family.

To see all of our wedding season coverage, check out IDoSugar.

Latest Smart Living

Download our Halloween app!

Go to App Store
+