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What Not to Do in an Interview, Part III

As companies shed more jobs and hire fewer new employees, having an impressive resume and perfectly polished interview skills are crucial.

Over the past couple weeks, we've been covering some of the biggest interview faux pas you may not even realize you’re committing. To see my next tip,

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Employers love to wrap up interviews by turning the tables on their applicants and asking, "Do you have any questions for me?" If you’re well-prepared, this is a great opportunity for you to impress your interviewer with an insightful question or two about the position.

What it’s not is an invitation to ask your interviewer personal questions about herself or try to get the inside dirt about the company. No matter how much rapport you feel like you’ve built up during the interview, personal questions cross the line into dangerous interview territory.

If you’re drawing a blank when your interviewer gives you the floor, squelch the urge to ask where she went to school or how she really feels about the new CEO. Instead, simply say something like, "Actually, you’ve been really thorough and have addressed all my questions so far." You can even ask the interviewer for a way to contact her with any follow-up questions you may think of later.

Source

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Join The Conversation
RRKenney RRKenney 6 years
What about "What do you like about working here?" I'm not looking for dirt when I write it but would it be read that way?
BettyRN BettyRN 6 years
Great tip-I've been through a lot of interviews , and some really DO cover all potential questions, so...just saying the questions have been covered is a great fall back in that situation. It is truthful, and it gives you time to think!
itsme3683 itsme3683 6 years
I always ask the interviewer how they came to their current position, but I'm in college so all of my interviews have been for internships, so I think it's more appropriate to ask about career paths because it's clearly what I'm set out to do. I really like the one about what's the most challenging part of the job, I think that would really show initiative! I'll have to remember that...
classicsugar classicsugar 6 years
You should definitely have questions prepared ahead of time that show you took time to research the company and the industry. While the interviewer is most likely going to cover all of the basics of the position, the part where you ask questions is a good way to dig deeper into the job. It also reflects poorly if you don't have any questions prepared - I usually count saying "No, you've answered all of my questions" against a potential candidate as it indicates a lack of interest.
aimeeb aimeeb 6 years
I would never dig for dirt.
runningesq runningesq 6 years
I've always heard that you should ALWAYS have good, thoughtful, insightful questions prepared -- ones that show that you've done your research. That said, if the interviewer has answered ALL of them, I think you should still come up with something to ask..
bchicgrl bchicgrl 6 years
Def a good tip, this is where I crash and burn in interviews. I never know what else to ask because I'm always sure that we covered everything we both would need to know prior.
miss-malone miss-malone 6 years
Good tip.
starangel82 starangel82 6 years
Thanks for covering this Savvy. I've mentioned this before, but this is one of my pet peeves. It says a lot to me if you have questions or if you at least ask for my contact information.
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