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Final Kodachrome Processing Machine Closed

Kodachrome Film Says Its Final Farewell Today

Kodak stopped producing Kodachrome, its first successful color film ever, in 2009, and today marks the last day the final operational Kodachrome processor will be used. Dwayne's Photo in Parsons, KS, will shut down its machine today, to be sold for scrap after the lab's last can of film processing dye has been used. The New York Times does a beautiful job of profiling some Kodachrome fans, including one man who just developed 1,580 rolls of Kodachrome film just under the wire, spending over $15,000 to do so. The article also notes the thousands of requests flooding into the store from both professional and amateur photographers for their rolls of film to be the last processed in the machine, which was initially slated to be shut down in July.

What will be the final roll processed? Find out after the jump.

The beloved film was introduced 75 years ago, and after its initial mainstream popularity, it settled into niche favoritism. While the film can be tricky to come by, it's been replicated in digital filters like Hipstamatic's "Kodot" filter — though true Kodachrome enthusiasts claim the original will be impossible to replicate.

Some hope the film, which has been described as "a pop culture icon," will undergo a Polaroid-like resurgence, but as Kodak has discontinued the film, which is both tricky and costly to process, it's unlikely that the movement will gain ground. As for the last roll? It will be shot by the store's owner and developed today. The last frame will be a photo of all of the store's employees standing in front of the store wearing commemorative Kodachrome shirts.

Source: Flickr User zsumoz

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