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Was The 'Harry Potter Leak' Digital Shoplifting?

Was The 'Harry Potter Leak' Digital Shoplifting?


The premature online release of Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, which will be in stores this Friday at midnight, has caused quite the ruckus.

Most fans are conflicted: Do I sneak a peek, strain my eyes and ruin the surprise, or do I patiently wait it out all the while knowing it's out there? One thing's for certain - the widespread use and availability of digital cameras and web access makes it pretty easy for someone to snag a copy of an unreleased book, magazine cover or valuable piece of information and pop it up on the web. Even if that means taking pictures of 784 pages and uploading them.

While I'm most interested in learning the identity of the geeky James Bond-wannabe that committed what I've dubbed the "Deathly Hallows Offensive," digital shoplifting isn't a new phenomenon. In fact in 2003, Japanese bookstores launched a national campaign against the trend after it was noted in the magazine world. (Publishers reported young women were snapping pictures of styles and trends in magazines and sending them to their friends instead of purchasing the publications.) Is the core of digital shoplifting one of those unavoidable repercussions of digital life, or do you think it should be punishable by law? Most importantly, what do you think should happen to the person who leaked the latest Harry Potter onto the net?
Source: Boing Boing

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